Sir William Johnson, 1715-1774
Papers, 1738-1808

Quantity: 36 Boxes (12 cubic ft.)
Access: Restricted due to extensive fire damage. Please see Research Use and Access Note.
Acquisition: See Provenance Note
Processed By: Fred Bassett, Senior Librarian, New York State Library Manuscripts and Special Collections, March 2007.

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Research Use and Access Note:

The papers of Sir William Johnson were severely damaged in the 1911 New York State Capitol fire. Thus, readers usually will be directed to use published sources that contain printed transcripts of the original manuscripts. A selected number of the documents were published in Volumes II and IV of the Documentary History of the State of New-York, edited by E. B. O’Callaghan (Albany: Weed, Parsons & Co., Public Printers, 1850-51). Similarly, documents were published in Volumes VI, VII and VIII of Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New-York, also edited by E. B. O’Callaghan (Albany, Weed, Parsons and Company, Printers, 1853-87).

The most comprehensive source of printed transcripts is the14-volume The Papers of Sir William Johnson (Albany: University of the State of New York, 1921-1965). Note that this set (referred to in the Container List as Johnson Papers) does not adhere to the arrangement of the original manuscripts, and it does not include full text of most of the documents in the O’Callaghan publications. The first eight volumes of the Papers contain transcriptions of documents found only in the original manuscripts, and are drawn largely from a printer’s proof of the transcripts compiled by New York State Historian Hugh Hastings. The manuscript of Hastings’s work was destroyed in the fire, too, so the printer’s proof serves as the only evidence of the content of many of the documents that were damaged or lost. Duplicate documents found in other collections or repositories were sometimes used to fill in gaps of fire-damaged text. Volumes 9-13 contain transcriptions of documents found in other archives, manuscript repositories and private collections in addition to documents from these papers that were not included in the first eight volumes. Volume 13 also includes a chronological list of the documents that were published in volumes 1-13 of the Papers and the O’Callaghan publications. Volume 14 is the general index to the contents of all 14 volumes. The introductory material in each volume of The Papers of Sir William Johnson provides further information on the volume’s content.

The key to locating specific documents in the original manuscripts is the Calendar of the Sir William Johnson Manuscripts in the New York State Library compiled by Richard E. Day (Albany: University of the State of New York, 1909). Since this item was completed shortly before the fire, it serves as the only complete record to all the documents that were in the original 26 volumes. Using the Calendar, one can determine which items were severely damaged or destroyed by the fire. The Calendar also includes references to documents that were published in the Documentary History of the State of New-York (including references to both the octavo and quarto editions of the publication)and Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New-York, and the duplicates found in records held by New York State Archives known as the New York Colonial Manuscripts.

Arrangement and Condition Note:

The Johnson Papers are arranged chronologically within three series corresponding to the major acquisitions of the 19th century. (See Provenance Note for further details.) Many individual items as well as entire volumes were lost in the Capitol fire. The condition of the 26 volumes that constitute the main group of Johnson papers can be described as thus: Ten volumes are in fair condition, twelve volumes are in poor or fragmentary shape, and four volumes are missing. Most of documents described as being in fair condition were salvaged and later mounted and bound together, circa 1913-1919. Many of these items suffered only a partial loss of the text. Documents rated as poor are those found to have lost a substantial amount of text. Many of these documents were mounted, too, but there are numerous gaps in the record. Thus, they were not always bound together. Some documents were found to be in such a fragmentary state, that it was not possible for these items to be restored and mounted. These documents are too fragile for research use. The container list provides specific information regarding the condition of each of the original volumes including those that were completely destroyed by the fire.

Provenance Note:

The Sir William Johnson Papers in the New York State Library were acquired over a period of many years. The first group comprised of several bundles of papers that were initially deposited with the Office of the Secretary of State in 1801. This group was eventually transferred to the library by 1850, the year when another large group was donated by John Tayler Cooper. Cooper inherited the papers from his grandfather, John Tayler, who had acquired them at an auction held at Fort Hunter shortly after the papers and personal property belonging to the Johnson estate were confiscated from Johnson Hall during the American Revolution. These two groups of papers were collated, arranged and bound under the supervision of Dr. E.B. O’Callaghan as volumes 1-22 inclusive. The papers found in volumes 23, 24 and 25 were purchased in 1863 from William L. Stone, Jr. through a special appropriation from the New York State Legislature. In 1866, another group of documents was purchased from Henry Stevens, who had obtained them at a sale of public records in London. The Stevens’ documents consist chiefly of Indian Department disbursements that were bound into volume 26. The final group of manuscripts and facsimiles, housed in box 36, constitute a collation of individual items that were acquired by the library via purchase or donation from various sources. They were initially accessioned and catalogued separately, but were collated and added to other Johnson papers in the mid-1990s.

Biographical Note:

Sir William Johnson was born in 1715 in County Meath, Ireland, and immigrated to the American colonies in 1738 at the invitation of his uncle, Peter Warren, a prominent figure in the siege of Louisbourg. Johnson settled in the Mohawk Valley about 25 miles west of Schenectady, New York, where he established a trading post to serve the needs of white settlers and Native Americans. Johnson served as an agent for his uncle, assisting him in the management of extensive landholdings in the Mohawk Valley.

Johnson is noted for establishing strong relations with the native tribes, in particular the Mohawks. He learned their languages, dressed in their clothing, welcomed them into his home and labored to preserve their lands from encroachment. He also provided the natives with educational opportunities and religious instruction. Johnson’s diplomatic skills were put to work during King George’s War (1744-48) when he enlisted Iroquois warriors in the war against France. He was also commissary of the store that equipped the Indians with munitions and other military supplies. After this war he was commissioned as colonel of 14 companies of militia comprised of volunteers from colonial settlers and the Iroquois Indians. He was also appointed as the principle agent of New York Colony with the Iroquois Indians. He resigned from this post in 1751 when the colonial assembly discontinued funding the position. In 1754 he served as a delegate of the congress of seven colonies held at Albany.

The French and Indian War, 1755-1763, brought Johnson great prominence as a military leader and negotiator with the Six Nations. Despite the failure of Johnson's assault against Crown Point, he was successful as a military commander. In 1755 his troops defeated the French in the Battle of Lake George and subsequently erected Fort William Henry. His victorious campaign here was rewarded with a baronetcy. In 1756 Johnson was appointed the superintendent of all of the northern tribes, a position he held for the rest of his life. Johnson’s forces again achieved great victory in battle in 1759 when they seized Fort Niagara, the key to the West. The following year he joined forces with Jeffery Amherst in routing French forces in the vicinity of Montreal. During the later years of the war, Johnson was in almost constant negotiation with the Six Nations and other natives. After the war, he won prominence by persuading the Iroquois to stay out of Pontiac’s Rebellion. In 1768 Johnson was the lead negotiator in the first Treaty of Fort Stanwix in which boundaries were established between the lands of native peoples and colonists. The boundary dispute between the Mohawks and Mohicans was settled here, too. Later he helped resolve a disputed claim to land in the Ohio River Valley.

Johnson acquired huge land holdings, much of which came as gifts from the Mohawks, and he became one of the wealthiest men in the colonies. In 1762 Johnson founded the city of Johnstown, N.Y., and was successful in obtaining its designation as the county seat of Tryon County. He also had a large manor house erected on a massive estate near there that was known as Johnson Hall, a baronial manor frequented by many native visitors. He married, first, Catherine Wisenberg, who bore him three children. After her death, he married two successive Native American women. The second of these was Molly Brant, sister of the famed chief Joseph Brant. Johnson died at Johnson Hall in 1774 and is buried in Johnstown.

Scope and Content Note:

The Sir William Johnson papers in the New York State Library, covering a period from 1738 to 1808, constitute the richest vein of documents related to his private life as well as his career in business, the military and government. From 1738 to1745 the papers are few in number. This is also true for 1774 through 1808. As Johnson had died in 1774, the few papers we have for those years relate to matters with which his relatives were connected. Johnson’s mercantile career is documented in correspondence, bills, receipts accounts, and other papers related to his activities as a fur trader and other commercial dealings with the Iroquois Indian Nations. In addition, there are many papers related to Johnson's activities as a land agent on behalf of his uncle, Sir Peter Warren.

Johnson’s military career is well documented in correspondence, memoranda and debit-credit accounts. During King George’s War, Johnson wrote about the difficulties of supplying troops garrisoned at Oswego. Johnson's activities during the French and Indian War are also well documented, particularly the assault against Crown Point that was a failure, the Battle of Lake George in 1755, in which his forces defeated the French and erected Fort William Henry, and the capture of Fort Niagara in 1759. After the war his papers concern his activities as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, his role in persuading the Iroquois to stay out of Pontiac’s Rebellion, and as lead negotiator in the first Treaty of Fort Stanwix, 1768, in which boundary disputes between the Iroquois and colonists were settled. (The Six Nations would ultimately cede large tracts of land in New York and Pennsylvania.) Proceedings of these treaty negotiations along with related memoranda are included in the papers.

The papers in the later phase of Johnson’s life reveal his wide interests and the multiplicity of his duties. In particular, his great interest in education and religion is evident in correspondence that concerns his role in helping to establish schools and churches. Johnson’s role in establishing Tryon County separate from Albany County is documented, too. Also, many of his letters reveal his great interest in imperial affairs and his loyalty to Britain. However, there is no evidence that he was either interested in or aware of revolutionary activity stirring amongst the colonies during the final three years of his life.

These papers also include many documents related to his extensive landholdings and the construction of his homes, Fort Johnson and Johnson Hall; the erection of public buildings for use by the county seat in Johnstown, New York, and other papers related to the settlement and development of land on the colonial frontier. These papers also include inventories and other documents related to the estate of Johnson and his family. In essence these papers are an invaluable source of information not only for political and military history, but also for the social, industrial, commercial, and agricultural history of the time.

Container List:

The Papers of Sir William Johnson is referred to in this container list as Johnson Papers.

Box Folder Contents and Condition of Documents
1   Volume 1, 1738-1755: Items 1-89 inclusive; documents mounted; unbound
2   Volume 1, 1738-1755: Items 90-159 inclusive; documents mounted; unbound
3   Volume 1, 1738-1755: Items 160-223 inclusive; documents mounted; unbound
4   Volume 2, 1755 (Parts 1-4); Items1-141 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
5   Volume 2, 1755 (Parts 5-7): Items 142-241 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
6   Volume 3, 1755: Items 1-275; missing items  1-7, 25, 35, 39, 47-50, 53, 65, 74, 75, 79, 88, 91, 93, 97, 99, 102, 108, 125, 129, 135. 147, 149, 153, 157,162, 168, 170, 185, 222, 234, 244 and 263; salvaged fragments preserved
7   Volume 4, 1755-1760: Items 1-222; missing items 1-34, 51, 58, 72, 77, 78, 90, and 93-222; also includes fragments of six unidentified documents; burnt/fragile materials closed to research
    Volume 5, 1760-1762: [245] items; this volume appears to have been completely destroyed by fire
8   Volume 6, 1762-1763: Items 1-248; missing items 1-103, 230-248; Items 103-123, 128 and 221-229: burnt/fragile materials closed to research; Items 124-127 and 129-220: mounted; unbound
    Volume. 7, 1763: [258] items; this volume appears to have been completely destroyed by fire
9   Volume 8, 1763-1764: Items 1-253; missing items 1-79, 123, 205 and 207-253; burnt/fragile materials closed to research
    Volume 9, 1764, Items 1-263: missing items 35 and 45-263; burnt/fragile materials closed to research
10   Volume 10, 1764-1765 (6 parts): Items 1-263; missing items 1-30, 35, 36, 50, 77, 165, 171, and 199-248; documents mounted; unbound
11   Volume. 11, 1765: Items 1-159; missing items 1-45, 47, 122, 146, 151, and 154; burnt/fragile materials closed to research
12   Volume 11, 1765: Items 160-285; missing items 170, 184, 228, and 270; burnt/fragile materials closed to research
13   Volume 12, 1766: Items 1-135; missing items 1-44, 48-63, and 134-135; documents mounted; unbound
14   Volume 12, 1766: Items 136-249; missing items 162-171; documents mounted; unbound
    Volume 13, 1766: [210] items; this volume appears to have been completely destroyed by fire
    Volume 14, 1767: [272] items; this volume appears to have been completely destroyed by fire
15   Volume 15, 1767-1768: Items 1-100; documents mounted; unbound
16   Volume 15, 1767-1768: Items 101-253; missing items 199, 202, 205, 209, 212, 213, 220-223, 224, 227-253; documents mounted; unbound
17   Volume 16, 1768 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-134 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
18   Volume 16, 1768 (Parts 5-8): Items 135-253 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
19   Volume 17, 1768-1769 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-143 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
20   Volume 17, 1768-1769 (Parts 5-7): Items 144-246 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
21   Volume 18, 1769-1770 (Parts 1-4):  Items 1-126 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
22   Volume 18, 1769-1770 (Parts 5-8): Items 127-277; missing items 220, 232, 233, 244, 261, 271-277; documents mounted; bound
23   Volume 19, 1770 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-141 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
24   Volume 19, 1770 (Parts 5-8): Items 142-278 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
25   Volume 20, 1770-1771 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-158 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
26   Volume 20, 1770-1771 (Parts 5-7): Items 159-267 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
27   Volume 21, 1771-1772 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-128 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
28   Volume 21, 1771-1772 (Parts 5-8): Items 129-255 inclusive; documents mounted; bound
29   Volume 22, 1772-1774 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-135 inclusive; missing item 71; documents mounted; unbound
30   Volume 22, 1772-1774 (Parts 5-7): Items 136-262 inclusive; documents mounted; unbound
31   Volume 23, 1738-1758 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-159; missing item 45; documents mounted; unbound  (The original volume states 1733 as the earliest, but later research has determined that the document originally calendared for 1733 is more properly dated 1738. See note in Johnson Papers, v. I, p. 4.)
32   Volume 23, 1738-1758 (Parts 5-8): Items 160-288 inclusive;  documents mounted; unbound
33   Volume 24, 1758-1765 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-259; missing items 1-78, 90, 108-112, and 114-169; documents mounted; unbound
34   Volume 25, 1765-1774 (Parts 1-4): Items 1-128 inclusive; documents mounted; unbound
35   Volume 25, 1765-1774 (Parts 5-8): Items 129-261 inclusive; documents mounted; unbound
35   Volume 26, [1748-1808]: Items 110-113 are all the remain of ca. 125 documents listed in the calendar; documents mounted; unbound

Letters by Sir William Johnson (catalogued previously as separate items).
A.L.S. – Autograph Letter Signed; L.S. – Letter Signed ; D.S. – Document Signed

Box Folder Contents and Condition of Documents
36 1 A.L.S.  Mount Johnson, to Edward Collins. Albany, February 1, 1745/6.
Re: prosecution of Garret Newkirk’s son for indebtedness; real estate and personal business. Published in Johnson Papers, v. I, p. 387 (13816)
36 2 A.L.S. Mount Johnson, to Captain [John] Lindsay, September 6, 1748.  Re: news on the ending of King George’s War. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p. 10 (13821)
36 3 A.L.S. Mount Johnson, to Captain [William] Eyre June 20, 1755.  Re: matters concerning the French and Indian War. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p. 43 (13828-1)
36 4 A.L.S. (draft) Johnson Hall, to John Wilkens, December 22, 1762. Re: problem of illicit trade of liquor between French traders and Indians at Toronto. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p.280 (12577)
36 5a A.L.S. Johnson Hall, to Samuel Fuller, January 5, 1763. Re: plans and specifications for building Johnson Hall. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p.282  (13279)
36 5b A.L.S. Johnson Hall, to Samuel Fuller, February 24, 1763.Re: plans and specifications for building Johnson Hall. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p.283  (13279)
36 5c D. (document) [Johnson Hall], to Samuel Fuller, [June 1763]. Re: memorandum on building materials for the construction of Johnson Hall. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p.285  (13279)
36 5d A.L.S. Fort Johnson, to Samuel Fuller, May 8, 1763. Re: labor cost and wages for workers building Johnson Hall. Published in Johnson Papers, v. X, p. 662 (13279)
36 6 A.L.S. to Col. John Bradstreet, January 10, 1764.  Published in Johnson Papers, v. XI, p. 13 (3421)
36 7 L. S. to Committee of Correspondence for Society of New York, January 4, 1765.  Re: express sympathy with the general objects, make subscription, and disavow sympathy with any schemes for the annoyance of the mother country. (Doc. Hist. N.Y.  4:346-7; Q. 4:220)
36 8 A.L.S. Johnson Hall, to Thomas Gage, May 27, 1766. Re: Indian affairs after the war and Pontiac conspiracy. Published in Johnson Papers, v. V, p. 224 (1355).
36 9 L.S. to Messrs. Baynton, Wharton and Morgan, April 1, 1767. Re: Indian affairs. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 291 (2534)
36 10 L.S., Blanford, to Christopher Leffingwell, Norwich, June 28, 1768.  Re: the necessity of taking Leffingwell’s wagon  (15011)
36 11 A.L.S. Johnson Hall, to John Kempe, February 25, 1769.  Re: matters pertaining to Mohawk Indians at Canajoharie.  Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 698 (12771)
36 12 A.L.S., Johnson Hall, to Lord Adam Gordon, April 4, 1769.  Re: tension between Iroquois Indians and white settlers over terms of the time of the Treaty of Fort Stanwix, 1768. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 711 (20617)
36 13 A.L.S., Johnson Hall, to Thomas Wharton, April 19, 1769. Re: depository papers and letters to Wharton’s brother and other business matters. (17198)
36 14 A.L.S. (draft). Johnson Hall, to Guy Carleton, June 20, 1769.  Re: discharge of officers appointed for the Affairs of Trade. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p. 486 (13828-2)
36 15 A.L.S(draft). Johnson Hall,  to Henry Van Schaack, March 26, 1770. Re: military matters, particularly the Claverack Regiment. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 807 (6088)
36 16 A.L.S. Johnson Hall to Maj. Jelles Fonda, April 1, 1771. Re; land development and other business. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 904  (12941)
36 17 A.L.S. to Janette Fonda, October 1, 1771.   Re: having cask filled with wine before the boat departs. (19943)
36 18 A.L.S. to Henry Glen, October 16, 1772. Re: dismay towards a dishonest business deal  Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 997 (13247)
36 19 L.S. Johnson Hall, to Maj. Jelles Fonda, December 18, 1772.  Re: tax assessment. Published in Johnson Papers, v. VIII, p. 663 (6696)
36 20 A.L.S. to Maj. Jelles Fonda, April 4, 1773. Re: expense account and business matters. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 750 (3422).
36 21 A.L.S. to [an unknown person], Monday Evening [March 19, 1770].   Re: concerns the bateaux near Sacondaga. Published in Johnson Papers, v. VII, p.492 (6061)

Letters and documents of Sir William Johnson relative to Indian Affairs

Box Folder Contents and Condition of Documents
36 22 Journal of proceedings of treaty negotiations with Onondaga Indians, April 24-26, 1748 (11449)
36 23 Minutes of a conference with Tiagawebe, a Tuscarora chief. Fort Stanwix, October 18, 1768 (1354)
36 24 D.S. Account of Daniel Claus, [July 20-September 21, 1769]. Re: Account of Indian expenses in District of Canada in Summer 1769. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XIII, p. 488 (12246)
36 25 Sachems of Oquaga, L.S., Onokokwage, to Sir William Johnson, January 22, 1770.  Re: rum trade. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 348 (4298)

Letters to Sir William Johnson

Box Folder Contents and Condition of Documents
36 26 Fitch, Thomas, L.S. Norwalk [Connecticut] to Sir William Johnson, July 1, 1755. Re: military affairs, particularly raising troops and supplies. (14624-1)
36 27 Fitch, Thomas, L.S. Norwalk [Connecticut] to Sir William Johnson, September 22, 1755. Re: Johnson’s success in the Battle of Lake George. (14624-2)
36 28 Gilbert, Thomas, A.L.S., Fort Edward [N.Y.] to William Johnson, October 19, 1755. Re: military affairs and aftermath of the Battle of Lake George. (13842)
36 29 Colden, Cadwallader, A.L.S. Fort George, to Sir William Johnson, February 22, 1762. Re: Colden’s concerns about his daughter’s illness and matters relative to Indian affairs. (14983)
36 30 Lord Hillsborough, L.S. Whitehall, to Sir William Johnson, January 23, 1768.
Re: his appointment as Secretary of State of the Southern Department of the American Colonies. (13935)

Letters from the collection of John E. Wyman, Fonda, New York

Box Folder Contents and Condition of Documents
36 31a William Johnson, L.S. Mount Johnson, to Jacob Glen, May 20, 1748. Re: concerns the Albany County Militia and other matters related to the military during King George’s War. Published in Johnson Papers, v. IX, p. 11.
36 31b Jacob Glen, A.LS. to William Johnson, May 23, 1748. Reply to the previous letter. Published in Johnson Papers, v. IX, p. 12.
36 31c William Johnson, A.L.S., [Mount Johnson], to Jacob Glen, May 23, 1748. Re: follow-up to previous letters and laws regulating militias. Published in Johnson Papers, v. IX, p. 13.
36 31d Jacob Glen, A.L.S. [Schenectady] to William Johnson, May 24, 1748. Written on back of the previous letter. Published in Johnson Papers, v. IX, p. 14.
36 32 William Johnson, A.L.S. Mount Johnson, to Jacob Glen, September 19, 1754. Re: matters relative to the local militia. Published in Johnson Papers, v. IX, p. 138.
36 33 William Johnson, A.L.S., Fort Johnson, to Jacob Glen, February 8, 1758. Re: commissioning of officers in the militia. Published in Johnson Papers, v. IX, p. 873.
36 34 William Allen, A.L.S. Philadelphia, to William Johnson, March 1, 1767. Re: regular and provincial troops and other military matters. Published in Johnson Papers, v. XII, p. 276.

Miscellaneous documents including facsimiles and transcriptions of original letters and documents held by other repositories or private collectors:

Box Folder Contents and Condition of Documents
36 35 Ballad, [ca. 1730s], attributed to Sir William Johnson (12409)
36 36 Portrait copied from original engraving published in London Magazine, 1776. Engraved and printed by Gavit & Duthie
36 37 Memoranda, ca. 1863. Stone Collection of Sir William Johnson Manuscripts (0933-0934)
36 38 Transcriptions of original documents courtesy of Joseph F. Sabin, dealer of books, prints, and autographs, New York, N.Y., April 1925:   Memorandum re: Indians at Mohawk Castle, June 23, 1746. (5200); Letter to Lt. Col. Glen, March 1, 1759 (5203); Letter to Thomas Gage, August 23, 1766 (5202).
36 39a Letter: Sir William Johnson, A.L.S., Johnson Hall, to [ ], April 19, 1769. Re: the militia, particularly business at Kinderhook. Photostatic copy, original held by Newberry Library, Chicago. Published in Johnson Papers, v. IV, p. 702 (10455)
36 39b Letter: Sir William Johnson, A.L.S., Johnson Hall, to Gen. Thomas Gage, November 23, 1769. Re: finances and other business relative to the Department of Indian Affairs. Typescript of original. Published in Johnson Papers, v. VII, p. 256 (7279)
36 39c Preliminary Treaty with Seneca Indians, April 3, 1764. Photostatic copy of original held by British Public Records Office. Pri. Col. Doc. 7:621-23 (2526)
36 40a Letter: William Lee. A.L.S., Niagara, to Sir William Johnson, July 14, 1769. Photostatic copy of original from Pennsylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia. Published in Johnson Papers, v. VII, p. 58.
36 40b Letter: Thomas Pownall, A.L.S., Albemarle Street, London, to Sir William Johnson, Johnson Hall, Albany County, N.Y., December 5, 1769. Photostatic copy of original Pennsylvania Historical Society, Philadelphia. Published in Johnson Papers, v. VII, p. 288
Last Updated: March 26, 2010