Horace Greeley
Papers, 1837-1872

SC19915

Quantity: 1 box (0.25 cubic ft.)
Access: Open to research
Acquisition: Collation of items formerly accessioned and catalogued separately; document accession number found in parentheses included with the description of each item
Processed by: Nicholas Webb, Student Assistant, State University of New York at Albany, May 2008

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Biographical Note:

Horace Greeley was a crusading journalist and politician best known for his editorship of the New York Tribune and for his unsuccessful 1872 Presidential campaign against incumbent Republican Ulysses S. Grant on a combined Liberal Republican and Democratic ticket.

Greeley was born February 3, 1811, in Amherst, New Hampshire, and spent time as an apprentice printer in Poultney, Vermont, and Erie, Pennsylvania, before settling in New York City in 1831. After a decade spent editing and publishing various periodicals, including a literary weekly called the New Yorker (no relation to the later magazine of the same name) and a series of Whig Party campaign newspapers, he established the daily New York Tribune in 1841. The Tribune quickly became an influential paper due to its high-toned daily news coverage and its reform-minded editorial policy; its nationally distributed weekly edition made Greeley a shaper of public opinion throughout the northern United States.

During his tenure as editor, Greeley supported a variety of reform causes, most notably abolition, and was a staunch supporter of the Whig Party and of its Northern successor the Republican Party. With the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Greeley pushed for an aggressive war policy under the slogan “On to Richmond!” The disastrous Union defeat at Bull Run forced him to moderate his strategic militancy, but he continued to advocate for the emancipation of the slaves as the explicit goal of the war.

Following the defeat of the Confederacy, Greeley initially backed the Radical Republicans and their program of Reconstruction and staunchly supported the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson.  By the early 1870s, however, Greeley, like many other Republicans, was becoming dissatisfied by what he perceived to be an excessively punitive Reconstruction policy and by the notorious corruption of the Grant administration. In 1872, a group of moderates split from the Republican Party and nominated Greeley to run for President under the Liberal Republican banner on a platform of civil service reform and an end to radical Reconstruction policies. The Democratic Party also nominated Greeley as its candidate for the presidency in hopes that a united ticket with the Liberal Republicans would garner enough support to defeat Grant. Greeley spent the summer and fall of 1872 campaigning for the Presidency.

President Grant’s supporters, including cartoonist Thomas Nast (who caricatured Greeley relentlessly in the pages of Harper’s Weekly), accused Greeley of having abandoned his principles for the sake of political ambition, charging him with selling out the freedmen and dishonoring the Union dead by making common cause with the Democrats. Grant was re-elected by large majorities in both the popular vote and electoral vote.  On November 29, 1872, exhausted from the strain of the campaign and distraught at the takeover of the Tribune by a business rival, Horace Greeley died.

Scope and Content Note:

This collection consists chiefly of letters written by Horace Greeley, many of which concern significant political issues in the United States during the mid-nineteenth century. Of particular historical interest are Greeley’s letters to a British correspondent, Thomas Alsop, between 1861 and 1866. In this series of letters, Greeley discusses the progress of the Civil War, its effect on the relationship between the Union and Great Britain, and the importance of the struggle to emancipate the slaves. Also of note are two letters written to a “Mr. Jackson” in the summer of 1871 in which Greeley expresses dismay at the corrupt behavior of Republican “carpetbaggers” in the postwar South; these letters provide a window into the growing discontent which would eventually lead him to break with the Republican Party.

Greeley’s role as a pioneer of American journalism is represented by several letters to Tribune editors, correspondents and readers, most notably by an 1856 letter in which Greeley chastises an editor for covering a scandalous divorce trial at the expense of serious political reporting and an 1864 letter in which he discusses his opinions on editorial censorship.

This collection also includes an assortment of portraits and several miscellaneous manuscript items.  The portraits consist mainly of engravings, but they also include a carte de visite and a high-quality caricature from an 1872 issue of Vanity Fair. Other documents include a handwritten Tribune editorial draft in which Greeley discusses the progress of American industry and a collection of outline notes for a lecture on temperance.

Container and Document List:

Box Folder Item Description
      Correspondence, 1837-1849
1 1 1 A.L.S., 15 October 1837, New York, N.Y., to Edward M. Griffing. 34 cm. (transfer from single accession #13231)
Greeley discusses the National Bank.
1 1 2 A.L.S., 31 January 1841, New York, N.Y., to J.M. Sterrett, Harrisburg, Pa. 2(4)p. 25 cm. (transfer from single accession #5121)
Greeley gives Sterrett instructions and thanks regarding a financial transaction in western New York and Pennsylvania. He informs Sterrett of recent Washington gossip regarding cabinet appointments and declines his offer of a printing job in Pennsylvania, explaining that “you know how hard it is to get out of a newspaper – still more, of two newspapers. I couldn’t give both mine away to-morrow if I had $1,000. It would disgrace me to stop them, even if I could think of such a thing.”
1 1 3 A.L.S., 8 February 1842, New York, N.Y., to John C. Spencer, Washington, D.C., 8 February 1842. 2(4)p. 25 cm.  (transfer from single accession #7596)
Greeley thanks Spencer for a recent letter and discusses various aspects of state and national political strategy.
1 1 4 A.L.S., 18 August 1844, New York, N.Y., to Joseph Boughton, Binghamton, N.Y. 1(4)p. 25 cm. (transfer from single accession #12226)
Greeley explains that he cannot visit Broome County at present, because he is “not fitted to address Mass Meetings, hav[ing] not voice enough … I will stay at home and try to be useful here.”
1 1 5 A.L.S., 23 March 1845, New York, N.Y., to “the Sons of Old Ireland who reside in and near Albany,” Albany, N.Y. 1p. 26 cm. (transfer from single accession #995)
Greeley regrets that he was unable to address the society because their speaking invitation did not arrive on time; “I should have derived great pleasure from an evening’s Facial Intercourse.” He hopes to have the opportunity to address them in the future and “to propose to you the following sentiment: The Right of the Irish People, and of every People, to control their own Domestic Legislation – in defiance of Power, and Pride, and Bayonets, and Falsehood, it shall yet be nobly triumphant.”
Attached page of newspaper clippings on posthumous memorials for Horace Greeley [late 1870s?].
1 1 6 A.L.S., 21 March 1846, New York, N.Y., to William E. Robinson, Washington, D.C. 1(4)p. 26 cm. (transfer from single accession #1556).
Greeley gives instructions to Robinson, the Washington correspondent of the Tribune.
1 1 7 A.L.S., 15 December 1846, New York, N.Y., to William E. Robinson, [Washington, D.C.] 1p. 26 cm. (transfer from single accession #1558).
Greeley discusses the extreme financial difficulties the Tribune has been undergoing. Although deeply in debt, he refuses to give up and sell the paper: “our paper has been built up by hard work and is profitable… I can’t give it away now.”
1 1 8 A.L.S., 17 April 1848, New York, N.Y., to General Leslie Combs, Lexington, KY. 2(4)p. 26 cm. (transfer from single accession #8712)
Greeley invites Combs to the Whig nominating convention and discusses the prospects of various candidates. Greeley, a supporter of Henry Clay, expects New York, New Jersey and Connecticut to support his candidate, but Massachusetts and New Hampshire are strongly for Webster and Pennsylvania is in doubt. He urges Combs to “bring the South up to its fullest capacity” in favor of Clay.
1 1 9 A.L.S., 7 August 1848, New York, N.Y., to William E. Robinson. 1p. 25 cm. (transfer from single accession #1557)
Greeley informs Robinson of the schedule for his upcoming trip to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and discusses the Free Soil Party’s upcoming nominating convention.
1 1 10 A.L.S., 26 October 1849, New York, N.Y., to “Friend Dwight,” [Boston, Mass?]. 1p. (transfer from single accession #15793)
Greeley loans $100 to “the Tailors’ Association of your city” via an agent in Boston. He asks his correspondent to “exhort the tailors to persevere” and hints that he is willing to donate more money “to keep them at work for themselves and the Emancipation of Labor.”
      Correspondence, 1850-1858
1 2 1 A.L.S. 6 March 1850, New York, N.Y., to Rev. H.T. Harrington. 1(4)p. 26 cm. (transfer from single accession #3727)
Greeley discusses finances and appointments.
1 2 2 A.L.S. 28 December 1853, New York, N.Y., to S. Draper. 1(4)p. 16 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
A letter of recommendation on behalf of “Mr. O’Flaherty, one of the most deserving and capable among the candidates for Coach Boat Inspector.” Greeley hopes that Mr. Draper will “do [his] best to make his calling and election sure.”
1 2 3 A.L.S. 7 July 1854, New York, N.Y. to Sarah Pellet, Syracuse, N.Y. 4p. 16 cm. (transfer from single accession #15642) (Includes transcript.)
Greeley discusses the proposal of an inventor named Mr. Osgood, who claims to have invented a newspaper folding machine – but “he don’t say how many papers it will fold per hour, nor how much it is to cost, nor how much room it is to require… nor anything else that I need to know.” He compares it to “the play of Hamlet with not only the part of Hamlet, but those of Ophelia and several others omitted.”
1 2 4 A.L.S. 24 July 1854, New York, N.Y. to P.T. Barnum, Bridgeport, Conn. 2(4)p. 16 cm. (transfer from single accession #6060) (Extremely fragmented; includes photocopy and transcript.)
Greeley, who is “in bad health,” implores Barnum to visit him in New York City and assist in finding a superintendent for the Crystal Palace. [The New York Crystal Palace, an imitation of the Crystal Palace in London, had been built for the 1853 World’s Fair.]
1 2 5 A.L.S. 21 January 1856, Washington, D.C., to A.W. Thayer. 4p. 19 cm. (transfer from single accession #8713) (Includes transcript.)
Greeley writes regarding the situation of his wife and children, who, last he was aware, were living on the Raegerstrasse in Dresden, Germany. His wife’s health is poor and her sanity “not of the highest order”; if she is to die or become disabled, Greeley wants his children to be returned to the United States.
1 2 6 A.L.S. 9 February 1856, Washington, D.C., to [Charles A.] Dana. 4p. 19 cm. (transfer from single accession #15640) (Includes transcript.)
Greeley, in Washington covering politics, is frustrated that the Tribune has been printing uncorroborated claims regarding the membership of the Know-Nothing movement, as this has affected his own ability to gather information.
1 2 7 A.L.S. 2 March [1856], Washington, D.C., to “Fellow Citizen” (identified on catalog card as Charles A. Dana.) 4p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #15639) (Includes transcript.)
Greeley chastises a Tribune editor for printing coverage of a scandalous divorce trial while neglecting Greeley’s own dispatch from Washington, accusing him of failing “to consider fairly what is and what is not printable,” and criticizes some other aspects of the Tribune’s recent editorial policy.
1 2 8 A.L.S. 29 October 1858, New York, N. Y., to James Kelly. 1p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #2648)
A letter of recommendation on behalf of William [Coughlin?], who is “true and efficient” and will “help our vote in the Seventeenth Ward, among his fellow countrymen, if encouraged and aided to do so.”
1 2 9 A.L.S. [1858] to [Charles A. Dana] 1p. 19 cm. (transfer from single accession #6071)
Greeley discusses the unfortunate omission of an excellent speech on the Kansas question from the most recent Weekly Tribune. Due to space reasons, it could not be printed in the current issue, but he hopes it can be included next week.
      Correspondence, 1861-1869
1 3 1 A.L.S., 30 March 1861, New York, N.Y., to Thomas Alsop, Exeter, England.  3(4) p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14669-1)
In this letter, written after the secession of the Southern slave states but before the beginning of open war at Fort Sumter, Greeley discusses the secession crisis with an English friend. “I do not see that our dissensions can result otherwise than in a formal separation,” he writes, but “if separate we must, all humane persons must hope that we do so bloodlessly.” The breakup of the Union, he argues, will affect the industrial development of the Free States and their trade with England: “We of the Free States must manufacture – you will not let us pay you for your Cloths and Wares with Granite and Ice.”
1 3 2 A.L.S., 25 November 1861, New York, N.Y., to unknown correspondent. 1(4)p. 16 cm. (transfer from single accession #4797)
A brief note expressing “the hope that our Country’s sufferings are near their close and that your efforts will contribute to mitigate the hardships endured by her brave defenders.”
1 3 3 A.L.S., 25 November 1861, Thomas Alsop, Redhill, England to Horace Greeley, New York, N.Y.,  21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14668)
Alsop describes English feeling about the Civil War. The failure of the Union government to explicitly condemn slavery, and the dismissal of John C. Fremont, have turned public sentiment against the Union, and many Englishmen now believe that the Confederacy has “as good grounds for secession as the Colonies for resistance to the Mother Country.” He hopes that Greeley can find a way to circulate copies of the Tribune in England to counteract this trend – at present “we see only the Herald and hear only of the New York Times.
1 3 4 A.L.S., 6 January 1862, New York, N.Y., to “Sam W.” (identified on catalog card as Samuel Wilkeson, Washington, D.C.). 3(4)p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #16339). Includes envelope.
Greeley discusses how the circulation numbers of the Tribune’s various editions have been affected by changing prices. He regrets that the higher cost of the paper now makes it less accessible to young people.
1 3 5 A.L.S., 31 March 1862, New York, N.Y., to Thomas Alsop [Junior?], [California.] 1(4)p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14669-5)
Greeley explains to Alsop [son of the Thomas Alsop with whom he has been corresponding regarding the war?] that “it is 2½ years since I was in California, and that is equal to thirty in Europe. Almost everyone I knew there is either dead or gone elsewhere.” Nonetheless, he encloses a letter of recommendation to some individuals he knows in San Francisco. (See item 6 below.)
1 3 6 A.L.S., 31 March 1862, New York, N.Y., to John S. Hittell, Esq., and W.B. Farrell, Esq., San Francisco, California. 1(4) p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14669-2)
A letter of recommendation on behalf of Thomas Alsop [Junior?], “the son of an old and dear English friend,” who is emigrating to British Columbia by way of California. Greeley asks that Alsop be “introduce[d] to some one who will give him the best possible advice with regard to the country he proposes to make his home.”
1 3 7 A.L.S., 8 August 1862, New York, N.Y., to Thomas Alsop, London, England. 2(4) p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14669-3)
Greeley explains that he “do[es] not look with alarm on the prospect of European intervention” in the Civil War, as he “suspect[s] it will hasten that Emancipation which is our great need and our best hope. Besides, if we must go down as a nation, it will be less humiliating to be partitioned by foreign powers, as Poland was, than to succumb to a domestic treason.” Nonetheless, he does not consider intervention a likely prospect. The Union fighting men are “the best in the world… be patient with us, and we will try to pull through by Christmas.” 
1 3 8 A.L.S., 26 October 1862, New York, N.Y., to Thomas Alsop, [England]. 2(4) p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14669-4)
Greeley explains to his friend, apparently an advocate of peace without reunion, that the Union “can’t let go of the South,” any more than England could let go of Scotland or Wales. If a peace without reunion were to be concluded, the Democrats would “commence negotiations for a ‘reconstruction’ on the basis of the legalization of Slavery over the whole country.” “We are fighting the battle of Civilization and Progress,” says Greeley, “against the most infernal conspiracy that the world ever knew.”
1 3 9 A.L.S, 25 November 1862, New York, N.Y., to Schuyler Colfax, Washington, D.C.  1p. 20 cm. (transfer from single accession #15909)
Greeley exhorts his friend Schuyler Colfax (a Republican Congressman from Indiana and former Tribune correspondent who would go on to serve as Speaker of the House from 1863 to 1869 and as Vice President during the first Grant administration) to advise President Lincoln on the disposition of troops in the western theater. “I want you to say to the President… give Fremont a chance, let him take Scofield and Blunt’s forces, and clean out Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas of rebellion and slavery. Give him 30,000 men well equipped, and he will take these three states by March.”
1 3 10 A.L.S., 8 January 1863, New York. N.Y., to Samuel Wilkerson, Washington, D.C. 3(4)p. 20 cm. (transfer from single accession #16346). Includes envelope.
Greeley discusses the Tribune’s finances and the prospects for an end to the Civil War, observing that the Northern public is weary of the fighting; “it is absolutely necessary, for political reasons, that the Republicans should not rest under the imputation of willfully and want only prolonging it.”
1 3 11 A.L.S., 6 May 1863, New York, N.Y., to Allan Campbell. 1p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #8711)
Letter of recommendation on behalf of John T. Brothers, a Navy man who has been obliged to resign due to ill health and is seeking employment as a railroad conductor.
1 3 12 A.L.S., 5 April 1864, New York, N.Y., to Richard Wynkoop, Yonkers, N.Y. 1(4)p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #4351a)
Greeley tells Wynkoop where and when to call on him for an in-person meeting.
1 3 13 A.L.S., 15 June 1864, New York, N.Y., to H.E. Booker. 3(4)p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14922)
Greeley, replying to a reader who was apparently offended by a book advertised in the Tribune, explains his views on censorship. An editor, he believes, has no right to refuse advertisements for certain books simply because they are of “immoral or licentious tendency.” After all, “the Catholic deems this the inevitable tendency of Protestant writing; the Orthodox Protestant of Universalist inculcations, the Universalist ditto of the Deist; the Deist of the Atheist, &c.” Although Greeley opposes the doctrines of “’Free Love’… and Easy Divorce,” he will not “subvert Freedom of Discussion” on the basis of his own prejudices. Only if a book has been proscribed as legally obscene will Greeley refuse to advertise it; accordingly, his correspondent must take his complaint up with the Police Department and the District Attorney. Greeley, in the meantime, will “stand in the shadow” and permit the matter to be handled by the proper authorities.
1 3 14 A.L.S., 22 February 1865, New York, N.Y., to Thomas Alsop, [?], England. 4 p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #14669-6)
Greeley explains that, although he desires an end to the war, there can be no lasting peace until the slavery question is resolved. “The Rebels,” he observes, “might have long since secured, through European help, their independence, by giving up Slavery; they rejected it because independence has for them no other end or aim but Slavery.” He discusses General Sherman’s campaign in the South, expresses concern over British treatment of American trading vessels, and claims that enemies of liberty worldwide fear a Union victory: “There is not a Tory nor a Jesuit on earth who is not our mortal foe; and his instinct does not deceive him.”
1 3 15 A.L.S. [1865?], to “H.” 2p. 25 cm. (transfer from single accession #5117) (Greeley’s autographed response written on an A.L.S. from “H.” addressed to “Editor Press.”)
Greeley, responding to a correspondent who wonders “how we can compete with foreign nations in foreign markets and claim a protective tariff to compete with them at home,” explains the advantages of a tariff to the American economy.
1 3 16 A.L.S., 27 February 1866, New York, N.Y., to Thomas Alsop, England. 4p. 22 cm. (transfer from single accession #14669-7)
Greeley disagrees with his friend’s pessimistic assessment of the condition of the postwar United States – “true, we have our little difficulties and differences still,” but the country is well on the road to recovery from a war which had to have been fought eventually. He hopes that Franco-Austrian domination of Mexico will continue and that Emperor Maximilian will “fill the country with railroads and good highways,” because in the long run this will be advantageous to the United States: “If we should ever want Mexico, we can take it; but we should prefer to take it ‘with all the modern improvements.’” He is not, however, a supporter of the Fenian movement for Irish independence, which “disgusts” him.
1 3 17 A.L.S., 7 September 1866, New York, N.Y., to [?] Sloane. 22 cm. (transfer from single accession #18739)
Greeley discusses the upcoming Congressional elections, in which he is sure that the Radical Republicans will easily carry New York State. Greeley notes that he “may possibly be a candidate next Winter, but I shall not seek to be.”
1 3 18 A.L.S., 9 October 1866, New York, N.Y., to Hon. F.A. Conkling, [New York, N.Y.]. 1(4) p. 22 cm. (transfer from single accession #16029)
Greeley asks that he not be announced as a speaker at the upcoming “Great Meeting,” as he will be canvassing in the western part of the state on that day.
1 3 19 A.L.S., 6 January 1868, New York, N.Y., to Helen R. Marshall, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. 2(4)p. 22 cm. (transfer from single accession #1050)
Greeley advises a youthful correspondent not to go into debt “to embark in trade,” as most business ventures typically fail and an outstanding debt would put her family in a precarious position should she fall ill or die.
1 3 20 A.L.S., 18 August 1868, New York, N.Y., to J.H. Plumb, Esq., “and others,” Gowanda, N.Y. 1p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #13204)
Greeley declines a speaking engagement due to overwork and suggests the names of several other speakers who can address the meeting in his stead.
1 3 21 A.L.S., 21 February 1869, New York, N.Y., to Alfred B. Street, Esq., Albany, N.Y. 1p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #13904)
Greeley promises to try to “find or make an opportunity” in Albany for his correspondent.
      Correspondence, 1870-1872
1 4 1 A.L.S., 20 February 1870, New York, N.Y., to O. D. Case, Esq., 1p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #4351b)
Greeley requests more detailed information on a proposed business transaction which he will be bringing before his partners.
1 4 2 A.L.S., 12 August 1870, New York, N.Y., to John Taylor Hall, Albany, N.Y. 1p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #4351)
Greeley informs Hall that he will be passing through Albany on the 17th and would like to see him if possible.
1 4 3 A.L.S., 6 August 1871, New York, N.Y., to “Mr. Jackson.” 2 p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #18101-1)
Greeley, replying to a correspondent who apparently disliked his criticisms of corruption among Republican carpetbaggers, argues that although the majority of carpetbaggers are honest men, some are not, and the Party will be harmed if it does not “cast off these thieves.”
1 4 4 A.L.S., 11 August 1871, New York, N.Y., to “Mr. Jackson.” 1p. 21 cm. (transfer from single accession #18101-2)
Greeley, presumably responding to Jackson’s reply to his previous letter (Item 3), states forcefully that he has not made “general charges of thieving” against Republican carpetbaggers but has drawn a clear distinction between the honest and the dishonest; “the one and only way to vindicate the good name of honest ‘carpet-baggers’” is to denounce the corrupt minority.
1 4 5 A.L.S., 13 January 1872, New York, N.Y., to William L. Stone, Esq. 2(4) p. 20 cm. (transfer from single accession #8070 [6076?]) (Includes envelope.)
Greeley criticizes Stone, author of History of New York City from the Discovery to the Present Day, for not providing any detail on the election of 1800, “the most interesting event (to me) in our city’s annals.”
1 4 6 A.L.S., 19 January 1872, New York, N.Y., to R.N. Reavis, Esq. 1p. (transfer from single accession #15908)
Greeley informs Reavis that he has written the piece which he requested.
1 4 7 A.L.S., 29 May 1872, New York, N.Y., to John Taylor Hall, Stuttgart, Germany. 2(4) p. 20 cm. (transfer from single accession #4350)
Greeley discusses his recent nomination as the Presidential candidate of the Liberal Republican Party. “My nomination, though unexpected, gratifies me in that it seems to please my many friends... I don’t know that I fully share their confidence, but the prospect seems quite hopeful.”
1 4 8 A.L.S., 14 August 1872, [Goshen?], N.H., to George W. Sterling, Esq. 1p.  21 cm. (transfer from single accession #13207)
Greeley, campaigning for President, thanks Sterling for his well-wishes. “I think I shall be elected,” writes Greeley, but even if he is not, he will be grateful for having received the nomination.
      Writings
1 5 1 Editorial, for New York Tribune, Mss. draft, n.d. . 7p. 29 cm. (transfer from single accession #5500)
Editorial manuscript from the New York Tribune. In this handwritten draft, Greeley praises American manufacturing and argues that “under a beneficent policy of encouragement and support,” America will “develop new and larger possibilities of industrial achievement” and thereby improve the condition “of all mankind.”
      Writings and Miscellaneous Papers, 1840-1854
1 6 1 Receipt, 21 March 1840, New York, N.Y. 1 p. 20 cm. (transfer from single accession #1042)
A printed receipt documenting a $3 payment to “H. Greeley & Co.” for one year’s subscription to the New Yorker. Signed “pp. I. Galwey.”
1 6 2 Poem, (A.D.S.) 19 June 1854, New York, N.Y. 18 cm. (transfer from single accession #15641)
A brief handwritten poem describing “my daily aspirations and my country’s ultimate attainments”: “Peace, but not without Liberty / Union, but not to dark Iniquity…”
1 6 3 Letter of recommendation of Thomas Parker, New York, n.d. 1 p. 22 cm. (transfer from single accession #7955)
A letter of recommendation, signed by numerous prominent individuals including Greeley, on behalf of a Post Office clerk who was unjustly dismissed from his post because he would not contribute funds to the Democratic Party. Signed by John B. Lincoln, Horace Greeley, C.W. Godard, E.D. Morgan, Stewart L. Woodford, Theodore S. Cuyler, Samuel Booth, Henry Ward Beecher, and Edward L. Molineux.
1 6 4 Notes for temperance lecture, n.d. N.Y. 25 p. 3 x 4 cm. Includes envelope labeled “Ms. of Temperance Lecture in the Handwriting of Horace Greeley and delivered by him. June 30 1873.” (transfer from single accession #5116)
Twenty-five sequentially numbered slips of paper containing the outline of a lecture on temperance. (The date given on the envelope is in a hand other than Greeley’s and cannot be correct, since Greeley died in 1872, although the handwriting of the notes themselves is unmistakably Greeley’s.)
      Folder 7: Cartoon, 1872
1 7 1 Cartoon, 20 July 1872. 36 cm. (transfer from single accession #1848 [1343?])
A caricature of Greeley from the 20 July 1872 issue of Vanity Fair. Caption: “Anything to beat Grant.”
      Folder 8: Photographs and Prints
1 8 1 Newspaper clipping, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 6 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
1 8 2 C.D.V., n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 10 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
1 8 3 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 19 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
Caption reads “Engraved by J.C. Buttre.”
1 8 4 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 22 cm. (transfer from single accession #4797)
Caption reads “Eng’d by A.H. Ritchie.”
1 8 5 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 26 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
Caption reads “Eng’d by H.B. Hall Jr. from a daguerreotype. D. Appleton & Co.”
1 8 6 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 24 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
Caption reads “New York. D. Appleton & Co.”
1 8 7 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 19 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
1 8 8 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 17 cm. (transfer from single accession #6070)
Caption reads “Photographed by Sarony. Engraved by G. Kruell.”
1 8 9 Magazine clipping, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 18 cm. (transfer from single accession #6069)
Caption reads “Horace Greeley in 1862. Age 51 years. Editor of the New York ‘Tribune’ from 1841 to 1872.”
1 8 10 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 30 cm. (no accession number indicated)
Caption reads “Engraved by J.C. Buttre.” 
1 8 11 Engraving, n.d. Portrait of Greeley. 31 cm. (no accession number indicated)
Caption reads “Engraved for the Eclectic by Geo. E. Perme, N. York after Photo by Sarony. Published by E.R. Pelton 108 Fulton St. New York.”
Autographed? Inscription reads “Yours, Horace Greeley.”
Last Updated: November 23, 2009