John Ellis Wool
Papers, 1810-1869

SC15361

Quantity: 98 containers (50 cubic feet)
Access: Open to Research
Acquisition: Gift: Sara G. Tenney, Williamstown, Mass., 1963, with accretions, 1965 and 1966; also includes a collection of documents purchased from Henry V. Button, Waterford, N.Y., July 1949 (acc. #SC12777)
Processed By: Fred Bassett, Senior Librarian, Manuscripts and Special Collections, 1993.

 

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Scope and Contents Note:

The papers of John Ellis Wool should be valuable to future scholars primarily because he was a disciplined correspondent and nearly a complete record is present of his long and varied military career that commenced with the War of 1812 and concluded with the Civil War. Comprising fifty cubic feet, these papers include letters between Wool and his wife, Sarah, correspondence with friends, relatives, and associates along with numerous, official military dispatches, orders, memoranda and reports. Materials are generally arranged chronologically within these series:

  1. Correspondence,
  2. Military Papers, and
  3. Bound Record Books.

These papers are especially valuable for the following five areas of interest.

  1. The reports and memoranda relating to inspections of military posts that offer insight into the every day operations of the United States Army during the first half of the nineteenth century.
  2. The Cherokee Indian nation transfer expedition, 1836-1837, which provides a well-documented record of how the army acquired and distributed subsistence and other necessary provisions to Indians enroute. In addition, these papers touch upon the controversial treaty of 1835 that mandated Cherokee Indian resettlement and the Army’s problem of dealing with disaffected Cherokees.
  3. The War between the United States and Mexico, the most extensively documented event in these papers, covering Wool’s mobilization of Western volunteers, the march from San Antonio to Saltillo, Battle of Buena Vista, and the occupation of Monterrey, Mexico.
  4. General Wool’s command of the Pacific Department from 1854 to 1857, with many fine details of the confrontation between white settlers and native peoples that developed into a bitter dispute between Wool and the territorial governors of Oregon and Washington. Also, there are materials relating to the controversial arrest of a French consul in accordance with President Franklin Pierce’s orders to quash filibusters.
  5. General Wool’s service during the Civil War, especially his command of the Department of Virginia at Fortress Monroe, that was the principal base of operation for the Union capture of Norfolk.

For these areas along with many other aspects of Wool’s military career, his papers are one of the best sources of information on the history of the United States military in the nineteenth century.

Biographical Note:

John Ellis Wool was born 29 February 1784 in Newburgh, New York. At an early age, both his parents passed away; thereupon he was removed to Troy to live with his grandfather, James Wool. His formal education was limited to that of a country school, and at the age of twelve he entered the store of a Troy merchant and remained with him for six years. During the next decade he worked at various places including the law office of John Russell. When the War of 1812 broke out, he raised and headed a company of volunteers in Troy, and on 14 April 1812, he was commissioned a captain in the 13th Infantry. His troops were engaged in action at the battles of Queenstown and Plattsburgh. In between the battles he was promoted to a major in the 29th Infantry on 13 April 1813, and, afterwards, was brevetted a lieutenant colonel on 11 September 1814. He was made colonel and inspector general of the Army on 29 April 1816 and maintained this grade for more than a quarter of a century. As inspector general, Wool’s duties required visits to military posts to ascertain the fighting effectiveness and preparedness of the troops. In 1832 he was sent by the government to Europe to study the military policies and procedures of several nations that could be adopted by the United States Army.

In 1836 Wool was ordered to Cherokee country in Georgia, Tennessee, and the Carolinas to assist General Winfield Scott in transferring the native peoples to Oklahoma in accordance with the terms of a treaty of 1835. It would prove to be a difficult mission as Wool’s conduct was called into question by Alabama civil authorities for allegedly seizing private property for subsistence and other provision needed by soldiers and Cherokees. As a result, Wool was recalled from service, but was later exonerated by a court of inquiry. Shortly thereafter, Wool was ordered to command troops along the United States-Canada border in northern New York and New England to ensure American neutrality during the Canadian Rebellion. Problems arose from many Canadian refugees and sympathetic Americans who had designs on annexing Canada. They were engaged in cross border raids and other subversive activities that nearly instigated a conflict with Great Britain. The forces under the command of Wool and others were successful in quelling such activities and thus preserving peace.

The Mexican War of 1846-1848 provided Wool with an opportunity for active and distinguished service. Now a brigadier general, Wool virtually mobilized, trained, and marched his own army, composed mostly of western volunteers, for the invasion of Mexico by land. Placed under the command of General Zachery Taylor as commander-in-chief with Wool second in command, this army won the Battle of Buena Vista in 1847. Wool was commended for his achievement and presented with decorative awards of honor by the United States Congress, State of New York, and Troy, in subsequent years.

Then followed the quieter years of peace, which were actually a troubled brief interlude between the Mexican War and the Civil War, then already brewing. Wool served as a commander at the Department of the East most of these years allowing him to maintain headquarters in Troy. In 1854, Wool was transferred to the Department of Pacific, headquartered in San Francisco, California with orders from President Pierce to halt filibustering expeditions against Mexico. In the course of duty, Wool placed under arrest the French Consul, Dillon, who was tried for complicity in such activities by a San Francisco jury. This action provoked anger from the French government, which subsequently led the Pierce administration to abandon support of Wool’s course in literally carrying out the President’s orders. Shortly thereafter, his headquarters were transferred to a bleak part of Benicia, where he would have to contend with the problem of land disputes between white settlers and native people in the Oregon and Washington territories. Having limited manpower and supplies for such a large expanse of territory, Wool’s solution was to exclude settlements west of the Cascade Mountains. This action resulted in a bitter dispute with the Oregon and Washington territorial governors, George L. Carry and Isaac Stevens, respectively, who already felt Wool was not responding quickly enough to protect white settlers. Ultimately, Wool was again relieved of command for political reasons.

The Civil War provided Wool one last opportunity for military service. He was seventy-seven years old, and in seniority and rank, he was second only to General Winfield Scott, whose career also dated back to the War of 1812. Despite his advanced age, Wool performed duties of remarkable variety and intensity. As commander of the Department of the East, first from Troy, with its nearby Watervliet Arsenal, and then from New York headquarters, Wool mobilized the resources of the most populous region for military service. Then, later in 1861, he was moved closer to the front to command the Department of Virginia, with headquarters at Fortress Monroe. There he extended the Union line by the capture of Norfolk, and was quite critical of General George McClellan for his dilatory program in preparing his forces for the capture of Richmond.

General Wool’s final tour of duty was in 1863, as military commander of New York City, so important politically and economically for the conduct of the war. Here, he lived through the draft riots, which nearly tore the city apart. He shared with the police and State militia responsibility for suppressing the riots.

Instead of support and commendation for his effort, Wool was retired from active duty on 1 August 1863, and he returned to Troy, where he stayed for the remainder of the war. Despite his seventy-nine years, he was never fully reconciled to retirement perhaps as much for the manner as the fact of what he regarded as a peremptory dismissal.

From his home in Troy, almost to his death on 10 November 1869, General Wool continued to write long letters to the War Department and General Grant demanding a kind of exoneration, if not reinstatement. On his death, he received a ceremonial funeral befitting a war hero in his hometown. He was survived by his wife Sarah Moulton whom he married 27 September 1810. They had no children. She passed away five years later.

 

Box Folder Contents
    Correspondence
1 1-18 Letters of John E. Wool to Sarah M. Wool, 1812-1858.
2 1-6 Letters of J.E. Wool to Sarah M. Wool, 1861-1863.
2 7-17 Letters of Sarah M. Wool to J.E. Wool, 1833; 1836-1845.
3 1-8 Letters of Sarah M. Wool to J.E. Wool, 1846-1863.
3 9-14 Letters of Francis Baylies to J.E. Wool, 1822-1846.
3 15-16 Letters of Henrietta Hart to J.E. Wool, 1841-1861.
3 17-18 Letters to Sarah M. Wool, 1825-1870.
3 19 Letters of Wool and Moulton family relatives, 1824-1832.
4 1-14 Letters of J.E. Wool to friends and associates, 1811-1845. (mostly copies and drafts of outgoing letters).
5 1-13 Letters of J.E. Wool to friends and associates, 1847-1860.
6 1-10 Letters of J.E. Wool to friends and associates, 1861-1869.
7 1-14 Letters to John Ellis Wool.
1812-1836 (September)
8 1-12    1836 (October)-1837 (March)
9 1-14    1837 (April)-1838
10 1-14    1839-1847 (March)
11 1-13    1847 (April-September)
12 1-15    1847 (October)-1848 (June)
13 1-15    1848 (July)-1851 (April)
14 1-17    1851 (May)-1852
15 1-15    1853-1855
16 1-19    1856-1861 (March)
17 1-15    1861 (April-September)
18 1-13    1861 (October-December)
19 1-14    1862 (January-May)
20 1-14    1862 (June)-1869
   

Military Papers

Copies of letters addressed to Wool’s field staff and copies of letters between other Army Offices.

    Alphabetical Files
21 1 Arnold, Richard
21 2 Benet, S.V. – Jefferson Davis
21 3 Franklin, W.R. – J.H. Kilpatrick
21 4-6 McDowell, Irwin
21 7 McLean, S.E. – E.M. Stanton
21 8 Strong, G.E. – Abraham Yell
    Chronological Files
22 1-13 1812-1847
23 1-9 1848-1862
    Certificates of Appointment
24 1 A.) Ensign of a Company in Battalion of Riflemen, 19 June 1811.
24 1 B.) Captain of Infantry, 14 April 1812.
24 1 C.) Major of 29th Regiment of Infantry, 13 April 1813.
24 1 D.) Inspector General in the United States Army, 3 May 1816.
24   General Orders of the War Department and the U.S. Army Adjutant General’s Office, 1821-1833
24 2 1821-1823
24 3 1824-1826
24 4 1827-1829
24 5 1830-1833
24 6 Original Drafts of Confidential reports of General Wool while Inspector General to the Secretary of War and Major General Alexander Macomb, 1826-1834.
24 7 Inventory of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores condemned by General Wool, Fort Trumbell, Connecticut, September 1831.
24 8 State and War Department documents authorizing General Wool’s travel to Europe on official business, 1832.
24 9-15 Proceedings, Reports, Expense Account Abstracts, letters, and other papers, relating to Wool’s proposed job title classifications and wage scales for persons employed at the Armory in Springfield, Massachusetts, 1832-1833.
25   Cherokee Indian Transfer Expedition, 1836-1837
25 1 General Orders, 1836-1837.
25 2 Rolls of the names of the Cherokee Indians at New Eschota, Georgia who received provisions of food and clothing from the U.S. Army, April-September 1836.
25 3 Summary abstracts of the provisions issued to the Cherokee Indians, April-September 1836.
25 4 Account abstracts of U.S. Army purchases and disbursements for food and clothing provided to Cherokee Indians, 1836.
25 5-6 Invoices for food, clothing, transportation, and other purchases of the U.S. Army from private vendors, July-December 1836.
25 7-9 Account abstracts and other assorted financial papers, Athens, Tennessee, October-December 1836.
25 10 Reports, regulations and other legal papers, New Eschota, Georgia, and Athens, Tennessee, July-December 1836.
25 11 Rolls of names and summary abstracts regarding food and clothing provisions issued to Cherokee Indians, January-June 1837.
25 12 Abstracts of purchases, disbursements, and returns of provision of food, clothing, etc., issued to Cherokee Indians, January-June 1837.
25 13 Account current statements of U.S. Army expenditures and disbursements, 1837.
25 14 Invoices, 1837.
26 1 Cherokee Subsistence Receipts, January-June 1837.
26 2 A.) Cherokee Indian Contingent Receipts, 1837.
26 2 B.) Cashier checks of the Union Bank of Maryland, 1837.
26 2 C.) Invoice of Subsistence Store at New Eschota, Georgia, 1837.
26 3-4 Provision Return of Cherokee Indians at New Eschota, Georgia, January-May 1837.
26 5-6 Provision Return of each individual Cherokee Indian at New Eschota, Georgia, January-May 1837.
26 7 Provision Returns of U.S. Army Companies, 1837. 
26 8-11 Reports, memoranda, and other assorted financial and legal papers, 1837.
26 12 Proceedings of the Court of Inquiry concerning the conduct of General Wool, 1837. Letters written in defense of Wool, including members of the Cherokee nation.
26 13 A.) U.S. House of Representatives Document No. 46 (25th Congress, 1st Session). Message of the President of the United States (Martin Van Buren). Transmitting the Proceedings of the Court of Inquiry in the case of Brevet Brigadier General Wool, October 9, 1837        .
26 13 B.) U.S. House of Representatives Document No. 82 (25th Congress, 2nd Session). Letter from the Secretary of War transmitting the information required by a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 2nd instant, in relation to the Cherokee Indians east of the Mississippi, January 9, 1838.
26 13 C.) U.S. House of Representatives Document No. 99 (25th Congress, 2nd Session). Memorial of a Delegation of the Cherokee Nation demonstrating against the instrument of writing (treaty of December, 1837, January 15, 1838).
    U.S. Department of the East
27 1 Papers concerning the effects of the Canadian Rebellion upon the northern frontier of New York State and Vermont, 1838.
27 2 Affidavits of U.S. citizens residing in Vermont regarding problems encountered upon entering lower Canada, 1838.
27 3 Depositions from Potton, Lower Canada regarding U.S. citizens residing in Troy, New York who are engaged in an invasion of Potton, 1838.
27 4 Depositions of residents of Troy regarding their involvement in the invasion of Potton, Lower Canada, 1838.
27 5 Depositions and last names of U.S. citizens involved in the invasion of Potton, Lower Canada, 1838.
    Inspection Reports and Inventories of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores of the U.S. Army.
27 6 A.) Fort Griswold, Connecticut, April 1840.
27   B.) Fort Trumbull, Connecticut, April 1840.
27 7 U.S. Army Depot, New York, New York, September 1840.
27 8 A.) Fort Columbus, New York, September 1840.
27 8 B.) Fort Hamilton, New York, September 1840.
27 8 C.) Fort LaFayette, New York, September 1840.
27 8 D.) Fort Mifflin, Pennsylvania, September 1840.
27 8 E.) Fort Wood, New York, September 1840.
27 9 Charleston Depot and Arsenal, March 1841.
27 10 A.) Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland, April 1841.
27 10 B.) Fort Monroe, Virginia, April 1841.
27 10 C.) Fort Constitution, April 1841.
27 11 A.) Frankfort Arsenal, April 1841.
27 11 B.) Fort Dickens, April 1841.
27 11 C.) Fort Jackson and Fort Philip, April 1841.
27 11 D.) Fort Pike, April 1841.
27 12 A.) Fort Independence and Fort Warren, Boston, Massachusetts, May 1841.
27 12 B.) Fort Johnson, North Carolina, May 1841.
27 12 C.) Fort Morgan, Alabama, May 1841.
27 12 D.) Fort Preble, Maine, May 1841.
27 13 Watervliet Arsenal Inspection, May 1841
27 13 A.) List of Employees (civilian).
27 13 B.) Inventory of timber supplies.
27 13 C.) Inventory of guns, carriages, shot shells, powder, and ammunition.
27   Inspection Reports of Troops, May 1845
27 14 New York State Posts
27 14 A.) Fort Columbus
27 14 B.) Fort Hamilton
27 14 C.) Fort LaFayette
27 14 D.) Fort Niagara
27 14 E.) Fort Ontario
27 14 F.) Buffalo Barracks
27 14 G.) Madison Barracks
27 14 H.) Plattsburgh Barracks
27 15 New England Posts
27 15 A.) Fort Adams, Rhode Island
27 15 B.) Fort Constitution, New Hampshire
27 15 C.) Fort Kent, Maine
27 15 D.) Fort Preble, Maine
27 15 E.) Fort Sullivan, Maine
27 15 F.) Fort Trumball, Connecticut
27 16 Military Posts of other States
27 16 A.) Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania
27 16 B.) Augusta Arsenal, Georgia
27 16 C.) Frankfort Arsenal, Pennsylvania
27 16 D.) Fort Johnson, North Carolina
27 16 E.) Fort McHenry, Maryland
27 16 F.) Fort Mifflin, Pennsylvania
27 16 G.) Fort Monroe, Virginia
27 16 H.) Fort Moultier, South Carolina
27 16 I.) Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia
27 16 J.) Fort Severns, Maryland
27 17 Proceedings of the General Court Martial of Lieutenant F.O. Wyse, Augusta, Georgia, June 1845.
27 18 Official telegraph messages, undated, ca. 1840s.
    Mexican War, 1846-1848
28 1 Orders, 1846. Issued from Washington, D.C., New Orleans, and San Antonio.
28 2 Orders, 1847. Headquarters Buena Vista.
28 3 Orders, 1847-1848. Army of Occupation Headquarters, Monterrey, Mexico.
28 4 Orders, 1847-1848. Headquarters Saltillo, Mexico.
28 5 Orders, 1848. Headquarters office of the Rio Grande, Matamores, Mexico, and War Department, Washington, D.C.
28 6 Reports and Memoranda, 1846. Regarding advancement of U.S. Army troops under the command of Wool from San Antonio, Texas to Mexico.
28 7 A.) Report of the killed and wounded of the Battle of Buena Vista, February 22 and 23, 1847, as shown mostly by the muster rolls of February 28 by companies and regiments.
28 7 B.) Report of the killed and wounded of the 2nd Regiment of Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, in the Battle of Buena Vista.
28 8 List and Return of Prisoners of the Army of Mexico captured at the Battle of Buena Vista, February 1847.
28 9 Journal of the March from Monterrey to Comargo and back, 8-28 November 1847.
28 10 Official reports, memoranda, etc., 1847-1848. Army of Occupation, Monterrey, Mexico.
28 11 Statistical Reports
28 11 A.) Report of discharge of volunteers mustered out of service, 28 June 1847.
28 11 B.) Return of the Volunteer Offices discharge before the expiration of their term of service by Brigadier General Wool and Brigadier General Taylor, September 1846-March 1848.
28 11 C.) List of Desertions from 4th Artillery, Light Co. B, Buena Vista, Mexico, 13 August 1847.
28 11 D.) Account of wages paid to eleven men of reserve guard duty, 21 December 1847-18 January 1848.
28 11 E.) Confidential reports of houses occupied by U.S. troops in Monterrey, Mexico, November 1847 and March 1848.
28 11 F.) List of officers occupying houses as Quarters or Offices in Saltillo, Mexico, 14 October 1847.
28 12 Inventories of Ordnance and Ordnance stores at Monterrey and Saltillo,
1847-1848.
28 13-14 Reports and statements of Subsistence Stores at Depots in Monterrey, Saltillo, and other points, 1847-1848.
28 15 Reports, memoranda and other papers concerning purchase orders and shipment of military supplies.
28 16 Claims submitted by Mexican authorities to recover the value of property seized or damaged at Saltillo, U.S. Army troops, 1847.
28 17 Documents relating to Order No. 404 and the discharge of Lieutenant Penders and others of the North Carolina Regiment, June-October 1847.
28 18 Court Martial Orders, 1847-1848.
29 1-11 Correspondence, Reports, Memoranda of the Mexican Army.
(Documents are written in Spanish.)
29 12-13 Translations of Spanish language documents.
29 14 Extracts from Mexican newspapers (In Spanish).
    U.S. Army Department of the Pacific, 1854-1857.
30 1 Statements and Testimonies, 1855, regarding the arrest of French Consul
P. Dillon for his involvement in filibustering expeditions against Mexico.
30 2 Report, 12 November 1855. Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory. Contains an extract from Captain Dall’s journal about the wreck of a California steamer on a bar in the Columbia River without any casualties among the passengers and crew.
30 3 Reports, 28 and 30 November 1855. Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory.
30   A.) Inspection of Fort Dalles, Oregon Territory and affairs in Indian Country.
30   B.) Military Reconnaissance of Fort Dalles, Oregon Territory.
30 4 Report, 18 February 1856. Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory. Regarding memos of a military reconnaissance from Post Oxford, Oregon Territory to Fort Lane, Oregon Territory by Lieutenant A.V. Kantz, 4th Infantry.
30 5 Statement of J. Neely Johnson, Governor of California, in reply to J.E. Wool’s report on military affairs in California, 1856.
30 6 Reports, 1856
30 6 A.) Memoranda and extracts from Lieutenant Colonel Casey’s correspondence during his command of the Puget Sound District, and particularly the Indian War in that district, 30 January-8 December 1856.
30 6 B.) Memorandum and extracts from the correspondence with Colonel Wright while commander of the Columbia River District, 14 January 1856-17 January 1857.
30 7 Reports, 1856-1857 Benicia, California
30 7 A.) Tour of Inspections at Fort Miller and Fort Lyons, 8 November 1856.
30 7 B.) List of Provisions on hand at Benica Depot, 31 January 1857.
30 7 C.) Estimate for erecting a two-story building, 10 June 1857.
    Civil War Service
30 8 Special Order No. 85, headquarters of the Army, New York, 8 September 1859, regarding inspection of Fort Monroe, Virginia.
30 9 Correspondence of J.E. Bristol, June 1862, regarding Union Army spies.
30 10-19 Letters of Benjamin Huger to J.E. Wool, September 1861-May 1862, regarding the passage of persons and goods from U.S. Army Department headquarters at Norfolk, Virginia to Fort Monroe, Virginia.
31 1-9 Letters, September-December 1861, addressed to General Wool at Fort Monroe from civilians requesting letters to be forwarded to soldiers.
32 1-11 Passes issued by the Department of State and War to civilians wishing to enter Virginia via Fort Monroe, May 1861-February 1862.
33 1 Muster Roll of noncommissioned officers and enlisted men of the 2nd New York Regiment of Infantry, 1861.
33 2 Inventories, returns, and other established reports on ordnance and ordnance stories of Fort Monroe, 1861.
33 3-4 Reports on Guard Duty at Fort Monroe, Virginia, September 1861.
33 5-6 Reports of Picket Guard mounted at Camp McMillan and Fortress Monroe, Virginia, September-December 1861.
33 7-10 Reports of the Officers of the Day on guard positions at Camp Hamilton and Fort Monroe, September-November 1861.
33 11 Special orders and other statistical reports, Camp Hamilton and Fort Monroe, August-December 1861.
33 12 Proceedings of the Board of Officers convened at Fort Monroe, Virginia by Special Order No. 181, 23 July 1861. Regarding quartering troops in private buildings.
33 13 Report of Colonel T.J. Cram, Aide-de-Camp, Chief Topographical Engineer and Inspector, General Military Department, Virginia, in detail, upon the taking of Norfolk, by Major General Wool, U.S.A., 10 May 1862.
33 14 Patent project files for Hotchkiss, rifled cannon, 1861.
34 1 Orders, 1861-1863.
34 2 Orders, reports, memoranda, 1861-1862, regarding capture of Norfolk, Virginia.
34 3 Certificates and testimonies concerning sailing vessels on the Chesapeake Bay, 1861.
34 4 List of prisoners held at Fort Calhoun, 1861.
34 5 Reports, memoranda and maps concerning the capture of Harpers Ferry Depot, 1862.
34 6-7 Reports, memoranda, letters, etc. relating to charges of misconduct of Colonel John C. Lemon and other officers of the 10th New York Regiment of Cavalry, 1862.
34 8 Documents relating to Federal and State elections held in the State of Delaware, 1862.
34 9 Notes of a tour of inspection made by General John E. Wool commanding the Department of the East, February 23-March 6, 1863.
34 10 Record of outgoing telegrams of John Ellis Wool, 21 April-1 May 1861.
34 11 Book of telegrams received by John Ellis Wool, 21 April-4 May 1861.
34 12 Telegrams (outgoing), Fort Monroe, Virginia, March-April 1862.
34 13 Telegrams (outgoing), Baltimore, Maryland, April-December 1862.
34 14-16 Telegrams received by John Ellis Wool, 1863-1864.
34 17 Express Company Receipts, 1861.
34 18 Assorted Military Papers, 1861-1863.
35   Manuscripts and Research Notes of Memories of John Ellis Wool by Francis Baylies, ca. 1850
35 1 Early life of John Ellis Wool.
35 2-3 War of 1812.
35 4-5 Cherokee Indian Transfer Expedition.
35 6-7 Rebellion in Canada.
35 8-13 War with Mexico.
36   Publications and other papers of Francis Baylies
36 1 A Sketch of the Life and Public Services of Major General John E. Wool, United States Army. (New York: Kettell and Moore, 1851)
36 2 A Narrative of Major General Wool’s Campaign in Mexico in the years 1846, 1847, and 1848. (Albany, New York: Little & Company, 1851)
36 3 Galley pages for a chapter on the Battle of Queenstown.
36 4 Register of Correspondence and other papers of John Ellis Wool.
36 5 Extracts of Correspondence, Memoranda and other papers relating to Indian Wars in Oregon and Washington Territories, 1856-1857.
36 6 Copies of letters from Captain G.W. Hughes, 1846-1849, regarding the Battle of Buena Vista and march from Monclova to Parras.
36 7-8 Excerpts from U.S. Congressional debates on the National Bank, tariffs, and other commercial matters, 1815.
36 9 Speech on Greece, 1823.
36 10 “Life and Character of General David Cobb”, 1830.
36 11 Assorted notes.
37   Sundry Papers of John Ellis Wool
37 1 Military Pension Records.
37 2-4 Hotel Invoices, 1830-1859.
37 5 Assorted Invoices, 1824-1828; 1848-1862.
37 6 Cancelled checks, 1820-1828.
37 7 Official Proclamations/Resolutions regarding John Ellis Wool
37 7 A.) Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 28 February 1853.
37 7 B.) State of Rhode Island, 4 March 1863.
37 7 C.) New Haven, Connecticut, 9 March 1863.
37 8 Banquets, receptions, etc., honoring John Ellis Wool
37 8 A.) San Francisco, California, 25 February 1854.
37 8 B.) Troy, New York, 23 August 1848.
37 8 C.) Albany, New York, 31 December 1848.
37 9 Speeches of John Ellis Wool (Place and Date)
37 9 A.) Republican Guards of Troy, New York, 4 July 1849, 3 pages.
37 9 B.) Dedication of a Monument in honor of Silas Wright, 27 August 1850, 5 pages.
37 9 C.) Albany, New York, 8 January 1851, 3 pages.
37 9 D.) Boston, Massachusetts, 1 June 1851, 5 pages.
37 9 E.) Buffalo, New York, [1851?], 6 pages.
37 9 F.) Troy, New York, 31 December 1853, 5 pages.
37 9 G.) San Francisco, California, 25 February 1854, 5 pages.
37 9 H.) Plattsburgh, New York, 11 September 1858, 5 pages.
37 9 I.) Troy, New York, 12 September 1868, 7 pages.
37 9 J.) Unidentified, 7 pages.
37 10 Manuscript of a commentary upon War Policies written by John Ellis Wool that was published in the New York Herald, November 1862.
37 11 Manuscripts of articles and commentaries of John Ellis Wool.
37 12 Social invitations and calling cards, 1858-1859.
37 13 Printed circulars from the War Department, 1820s-1840s, regarding military rules and regulations.
37 14 Printed circulars of the U.S. Congress, 1830s-1840s, regarding legislation concerning the military.
37 15 Printed circulars of the Treasury Department, 1847, regarding Tariff of Duties on imports, etc.
37 16 Printed Circulars: Railroad and Canal Companies, 1850s.
37 17 Printed Circulars: Societies, Clubs, etc., 1830s-1860s.
37 18 Printed Poetry and Verse, ca. 1850s-1860s.
37 19 Blank U.S. Army Report Forms, ca. 1820-1830s.
37 20 Miscellaneous printout and manuscript material.
38   United States Congressional Documents
38 1 25th Congress 2nd Session – House of Representatives – Document No. 305. Increase of the Army of the United States, April 5, 1838.
  2 25th Congress 3rd Session – House of Representatives – Executive Document No. 181. Message of the President of the United states, transmitting a report of the Secretary of State touching the territorial relations of the United States and Great Britain on this continent, February 11, 1839.
38 3 25th Congress 3rd Session – House of Representatives – Executive Document No. 183. Message from the President of the United States, regarding destruction of Steamboat Caroline, February 11, 1839.
38 4 25th Congress 3rd Session – Senate – Executive Document No. 35. Report of the Secretary of War in compliance with a resolution of the Senate, in reference to the defense of the Frontier of Maine, December 21, 1838.
38 5 25th Congress 2nd Session – Senate – Document No. 121. Documents in relation to the validity of the Cherokee Treaty of 1835, January 22, 1838.
38 6 26th Congress 1st Session – Senate – Document No. 306. Report of the Secretary of the Navy in compliance with a resolution of the Senate in relation to the adoption of the improved boarding – pistols and rifles invented by Samuel Colt, May 18, 1840.
38 7 30th Congress 1st Session – House of Representatives – Executive Document No. 59. Correspondence between the Secretary of War and Major General Scott, with accompanying documents, in compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 17th instant, April 20, 1848.
38 8 33rd Congress 2nd Session – Senate – Executive Document No. 16. Message of the President of the United States, communicating, in compliance with a resolution of the Senate, the instructions and correspondence between the government and Major General Wool in regard to his operations on the coast of the Pacific. Washington. D.C., December 26, 1854.
38 9 33rd Congress 2nd Session – Senate – Executive Document No. 25. Message of the President of the United States, in further compliance with a resolution of the Senate of December 5, 1854, requesting correspondence between Major General Wool and the different departments of government, January 17, 1855.
38 10 34th Congress 1st Session – House of Representatives – Executive Document No. 118. Message of the President of the United States transmitting the correspondence of Indian Hostilities in Oregon and Washington Territories. Washington, D.C., July 8, 1856.
38 11 35th Congress 1st Session – House of Representatives – Executive Document No. 51. Letter from the third auditor addressed to the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs on the subject of claims growing out of Indian Hostilities in Oregon and Washington, January 15, 1859.
38 12 35th Congress 1st Session – House of Representatives – Executive Document No. 88. Message of the President of the United States communicating correspondence between the late Secretary of War and Major General John Ellis Wool, March 23, 1858.
38 13 36th Congress 1st Session – House of Representatives – Executive Document No. 11. Report of the third auditor of the Treasury, in pursuance of a resolution of the House of Representatives passed February 8, 1858 regarding claims growing out of Indian Hostilities in Oregon and Washington in 1855 and 1856. February 10, 1860. - - Referred to the Committee on Military Affairs and ordered to be printed.
38 14 Message to Congress from President Franklin S. Pierce, Washington, D.C., December 5, 1852.
39   Printed Military Orders
39 1 1818-1826
39 2 1827-1829
39 3 1830-1832
39 4 1835-1837
39 5 1841-1845
39 6 1846-1847
39 7 1848
40 1-3 1847-1848 U.S. Army Headquarters of Mexico
40 4 1851
40 5 1853-1857
40 6 1854
40 7 1855-1856 (Bound)
40 8 1857 (Bound)
41   1860-1863 (Loose Bundles)
42   1864-1869 (Loose Bundles)
43   News clippings: Mostly related to the Mexican War.
44   News clippings: Mexican War, speeches of John Ellis Wool.
45   News clippings: Pacific Department Military Affairs.
46   News clippings: Civil War.
Box Volume Contents
47 1 Letter/Scrapbook, 1812-1838, 306 pages. Contains original correspondence and news clippings relating to various military matters.
    Inspector General’s Office, Brownville, New York
48 2 Letterbook, 1813-1821, c. 90 pages.
48 3 Reports, 1816-1819, c. 85 pages.
    Inspector General’s Office, v.p.
49 4 Inspection Reports, 1816-1819, c. 370 pages.
49 5 Inspection Reports, 1819-1841, c. 300 pages.
    Inspector General’s Office, Inspection Tour Reports, 1820-
50 6 Reports, 1824-1841.
50 7 Memoranda Book, May-September 1820, v.p., c. 150 pages.
50 8 Memoranda Book, May-September 1822, v.p., c. 150 pages.
50 9 Memoranda Book, April 1823-May 1824, New York, New York, 150 pages.
50 10 Memoranda Book, February-August 1824, Georgia, 150 pages.
50 11 Memoranda Book, November 1825-March 1826, v.p., c. 170 pages.
51 12 Memoranda Book, March 1825-December 1826, v.p., c. 100 pages.
51 13 Memoranda Book, May 1826-May 1829, v.p., c. 110 pages.
51 14 Memoranda Book, May 1830-May 1831, v.p., c. 120 pages.
51 15 Memoranda Book, June 1831-October 1835, v.p., c. 100 pages.
51 16 Memoranda Book, June 1832-February 1833, France, 140 pages.
51 17 Memoranda Book, January-April 1841, Washington, D.C., 60 pages.
    Cherokee Nation Transfer Expedition, 1836-1837
52 18 Letterbook, June 1836-May 1837. Athens, Tennessee, c. 191 pages.
52 19 Letterbook, July 1836-April 1837. New Eschota, Georgia, 371 pages.
52 20 Letterbook, September-October 1836, and August 1837, 32 pages.
52 21 Orders and Reports, June-September 1836, 23 pages.
52 22 Orderbook, July 1836-July 1837, 225 pages.
53 23 Letterbook, April-July 1837, 87 (312) pages.
    United States-Canada Border Patrol, 1838
53 24 Letterbook, February-June 1838, c. 102 pages.
53 25 Letterbook, January-March 1838, c. 133 pages.
    Eastern Division Command, Troy, New York, 1841-1846
54 26 Letterbook, 1841-1846, 384 pages.
United States War with Mexico
54 27 Correspondence and Memoranda, May-July 1846, 210 pages regarding mobilization of State militia forces.
55 28 Letterbook, 5 June 1846-30 March 1847, 393 pages. Indexed.
56 29 Letterbook, 26 February 1847-29 January 1848, 364 pages. Indexed.
57 30 Letterbook, 12 February 1848-27 March 1852, 362 pages. Indexed.
58 31 Abstracts of Letters Received, July 1846-December 1847.
“Army of Chihuahua”, c. 160 pages.
59 32 Letterbook, 23 July 1846-10 May 1847, 319 pages. Indexed.
“Army of Chihuahua”
59 33 Letterbook, 11 May 1847-9 December 1847, 129 pages. “Centre Division”.
60 34 Letterbook, 1847-1848, 300 pages. Indexed.
Part I.  1st Division, 20 August 1846-12 February 1847.
Part II. Army of Occupation, 9 December 1847-18 July 1848.
61 35 Letters Received Abstract, 1847-1848.
Army of Occupation.
62 36 Orderbook, 1846-1847, 285 pages.
“Army of Chihuahua” Centre Division Nos. 1-460,
2 August 1846-28 September 1847.
63 37 Orderbook, 1847-1858, 316 pages. Folio.
Part I. Centre Division Orders, Nos. 461-503, 2 September-2 November 1847.
Part II. Army of Occupation Orders, Nos. 132 of 1847 to No. 1 of 1848,
26 November 1847-17 July 1848.
64 38 Orderbook, 1846-1848, c. 400 pages.
Part I. Centre Division/Buena Vista Orders 1-517, 2 August 1846-5 November 1847.
Part II. Army of Occupation (Monterrey) Orders No. 133 of 1847 to No. 18 of 1848, 9 December 1847-17 January 1848.
  39 Orderbook, 1848, 186 pages.
Army of Occupation (Monterrey) Orders No. 19-175, 17 January-10 July1848.
65 40 Orderbook, 1846-1848, 320 pages.
Part I. “Army of Chihuahua” Centre Division/Buena Vista Special Order
Nos. 1-695, 4 August 1846-7 December 1847.
Part II. Army of Occupation (Monterrey) Special Order Nos. 141 of 1847 to 82 of 1848, 9 December 1847-31 March 1848.
66 41 Orderbook, 1846-1848, 351 pages
Part I. Centre Division/Buena Vista Special Order Nos. 1-475, 4 August 1846-9 December 1847.
Part II. Army of Occupation (Monterrey) Special Order Nos. 141 of 1847 to 240 of 1848, 9 December 1847-20 July 1848.
67 42 Orderbook, 1846-1848, 351 pages. Indexed
Part I. 1st Division General Order Nos. 1-19, 24 August 1846-12 February 1847.
Part II. Army of Occupation Special Order Nos. 85 to 240 of 1848, 1 March 1848-20 July 1848.
Part III. 1st Division Special Order Nos. 1-17, 26 August 1846-8 February 1847.
68 43 Morning Reports of Generals Wool’s Troops at San Antonio, Texas,
1 September-12 October 1846.
    Mexican Army Orderbooks, 1846
68 44 Regiment Perm de Cor. 3rd Co., October 1846.
68 45 Regiment Perm de Husares. 2nd Co., 1 October-25 October 1846.
69 46 Regiment Perm de Husares. 3rd Co., 20 October-?.
69 47 Letterbook, 1852-1853, Troy, New York, 92 pages.
69 48 Letterbook, 1854-1858, 391 pages. Indexed.
70 49 Record of General Wool’s Tour of Service in the Pacific Department, 1853-1856, 400 pages.
Includes copies of letters, orders and other related documents.
71 50 Appendix No. 1 of Wool’s Record of Service in the Pacific Department.
Contains original letters, orders, and documents.
72 51 Appendix No. 2 of Wool’s Record of Service in the Pacific Department.
72 52 Appendix containing Orders, Special Orders, and Circulars issued by Wool in 1854.
    Pacific Department Blue Book Series
73 53 Letters written and received, 1855.
73 54 Letters written and received, 1856.
73 55 Reports, 1854-1856, regarding Indian Affairs.
74 56 Circulars and Orders, 1854.
74 57 Circulars and Orders, 1855.
74 58 Circulars and Orders, 1856.
74 59-60 Military, topographical memoir and report with maps on the United States Military Department of the Pacific, p. 59 text, v. 60 maps.
    Eastern Department, Troy, 1858-1861
75 61 Correspondence, 1 April 1857-6 October 1858, 247 pages. Indexed.
75 62 Correspondence, 11 October 1858-24 September 1860, 253 pages. Indexed
75 63 Correspondence, 23 September 1860-3 August 1861, 70 (267) pages. Indexed.
76 64 Special Orders, March 1857-April 1860. 234 (265) pages.
76 65 Special Orders, April 1860-August 1861. 86 (265) pages.
77 66 Letterbook, 3 October 1859-15 August 1861. 323 (455) pages.
    Fort Monroe (Civil War, 1861-1863)
78 67 Letterbook, 19 August 1861-2 December 1861. 367 pages. Indexed.
79 68 Letterbook, 3 December 1861-1 June 1862. 512 pages. Indexed.
80 69 Letterbook, 13 June 1862-20 June 1863. 506 pages. Indexed.
(Middle Department, Headquarters, Baltimore, Maryland, June-December 1862). (Headquartered Department of East, New York City, January-June 1863).
81 70 Letterbook, 20 June 1863-9 December 1865.
(Headquartered Department of East, New York City, Troy)
82 71 Letters Received Abstracts, 1861-1863, 402 pages. (Fort Monroe)
83 72 Telegrams, June-September 1862.
  73 Telegrams, September-October 1862.
84 74 General Orders, August 1861-July 1863, 281 pages. Indexed.
(Fort Monroe, Baltimore, New York, New York, etc.)
85 75 Special Order Book, August 1861-July 1862, 375 pages. Indexed.
(Fort Monroe, Virginia)
86 76 Special Order Book, July 1862-April 1863, 372 pages.
(Baltimore, New York City)
    Scrapbooks: General Wool in Mexico
87 77 Volume I, 1846 Campaign and Exposition
87 78 Volume II, 1847 The Battle (Buena Vista)
88 79 Volume III, 1847 The Battle (Continued)
88 80 Volume IV, 1847 The Battle (Continued)
89 81 Volume V, 1847 Battle and Tribute
89 82 Volume VI, 1848-1849 Tributes
    Scrapbooks Pacific Department and Beyond
90 83 Clippings, 1851-1864
90 84 General Wool in California, 1854-1857
91 85 Scrapbook Civil War Service
92   Miscellaneous Items
    Prints and Broadsides
93 1 Portraits of John Ellis Wool.
93 2 Illustration of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.
93 3 Broadsides and printed circulars (Spanish).
93 4 Military Broadsides, ca. 1820s.
93 5 Newspaper Extras
93 6 Broadsides - Assorted Subjects.
    Annotated Issues of Newspapers (by place of publication).
94   Troy, New York
95   New York State: Albany - Glens Falls
96   New York State: Kingston - White Plains
97   New York, New York
98   United States
  Item John Ellis Wool Papers in the Vault (1 Box)
Vault 1 Cooper, James Fenimore
A.L.S. Cooperstown, [N.Y.], 2 December 1848
Vault 2 Davis, Jefferson
A.L.S. Monterrey, [Mexico], 9 April 1847.
Vault 3 Davis Jefferson
L.S. War Department, Washington, D.C., 28 August 1854. with attached draft response by J.E. Wool, San Francisco, 6 November 1854
Vault 4 Doubleday, Abner
A.L.S. Saltillo, 15 June 1847
Vault 5 Fillmore, Millard
A.L.S. Albany, [N.Y.], 19 September 1848.
Vault 6 Jackson, Andrew
A.L.S. Hermitage [Nashville, Tennessee], 26 February 1828.
Vault 7 A.L.S. Nashville, [Tenn.], 23 August 1836.
Vault 8 Lee, Robert E.
A.L.S. Bragus Santiago [Mexico], 7 February 1847.
Vault 9 Lincoln, Abraham
A.L.S. Executive Mansion, Washington, [D.C.], 13 July 1862.
Vault 10 Pierce, Franklin
L.S. Executive Department, [Washington, D.C.], 17 September 1855.
Vault 11 Seymour, Horatio
L.S. Executive Department, Albany, [N.Y.], 17 August 1863
Vault 12 Sherman, William Tecumseh
A.L.S. San Francisco, [Calif.],  6 June 1856.
Vault 13 Taylor, Zachary
A.L.S. Camp near Monterrey, [Mexico], 8 September 1847.
Vault 14 Taylor, Zachary
L.S. Baton Rouge, La,, 20 January 1848.
Vault 15 Taylor, Zachary
L.S. Baton Rouge, La,, 19 April 1848.
Vault 16 Taylor, Zachary
L.S. Baton Rouge, La,, 16 May 1848.
Vault 17 Taylor, Zachary
A.L.S. Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 28 July 1848.
Vault 18 Taylor, Zachary
L.S. Baton Rouge, La., 20 November 1848.
Vault 19 Taylor, Zachary
L.S. Baton Rouge, [La.], 13 January 1849.
Vault 20 Van Buren, Martin
A.L.S. 21 May 1821.
Vault 21 Van Buren, Martin
A.L.S. 31 May 1829.
Vault 22 Webster, Daniel
A.L.S. 15 March 1849
Last Updated: February 15, 2012