Great Things Happen in 3s! RAC Smackdown the IIIrd: New York Libraries are Innovation

NYLA Conference, November 4, 2016, Saratoga City Center Room 2B

Text from the PowerPoint presentation

Slide 1

Great Things Happen in 3s!
RAC Smackdown  the IIIrd: New York Libraries are Innovation
NYLA Conference, November 4, 2016, Saratoga City Center  Room 2B

Slide 2

Your Hosts
[image of] Mary Jean Jakubowski, Library Director
Buffalo & Erie County PL
jakubowskim@buffalolib.org
AKA “One of Western New York’s Most Influential People”

[image of] Claudia Depkin, Library Director
Haverstraw King’s Daughters PL
cdepkin@rcls.org
AKA “the Mother of our Country”

Slide 3

[image of Creating the Future… report cover] http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/adviscns/rac/2020final/2020final.pdf

Slide 4

Elaine Lasda

Slide 5

The Challenges:

  • Graduate Level Users
  • Spectrum of Student Sophistication
  • Commuter Campus
  • Staff Attrition

Slide 6

Desired Outcome

  • Market Services Effectively
  • Reach Students at Points of Need
  • Maximize Student/Librarian Interactions
  • User-focused Service Model

Slide 7

Step 1: Assessment Survey

  • Students only 
  • Demographics
  • On Campus? 
  • Perceived Skill Level? 
  • Instruction & Help Preferences? 
  • Triggers for Contacting Library/Librarian?

Slide 8

Results

  • 90%+ Using Library Resources & Services  – (REMOTELY)
  • 89%  Extremely, Very, or Confident Searchers
  • Want Subject Expertise, not General Reference

Slide 9

Into Action

  • New Strategy 
    • Play to Existing Student Expertise
    • Focus on One-on-One Consults/Instruction
    • Use Technology to Meet/Teach Remotely
    • Welcome Day Event
    • Contextual Chat Reference

Slide 10

The Knockout Impact

  • Fall 2014 – Fall 2015
    • # Consults DOUBLED 
  • September 2015 – June 2016
    • 110 Total Consults
    • 1 appointment per 14 FTEs
  • 100+ Students Reached on Welcome Day Fall 2016

Slide 11

The Future!
^ Consults by Web Conferencing
^ Integration in Disciplinary Curricula
^ Assess/Market to Faculty & Adjuncts
? Persona-Based Marketing

Slide 12

Thank you!
Elaine Lasda
elasdabergman@albany.edu
Dewey Graduate Library, 
University at Albany
http://slideshare.net/librarian68

Slide 13

Share, Listen, Learn; Stories of Rockland County
Brian Jennings, Local History Librarian, New City Library
bjennings@rcls.org
[images of logos Ramapo Catskill Library System, Library Association of Rockland County, New City Library; photo collage]

Slide 14

HRVH.ORG – ESLN – DP.LA

  • Full interviews are uploaded to HRVH.org via the Southeastern New York Library Resources Council.
  • Through the Empire State Library Network our metadata is added to the Digital Public Library of America at http://dp.la where we can see the connections between our local history and national history.

[images of logos of Hudson River Valley Heritage, Southeastern New York Library Resources Council, Empire State Library Network, Digital Public Library of America]

Slide 15

[image of] Walter Luther
I spent most of my summers at my grandfather's, which was in Sandy Fields in Harriman State Park. I enjoyed that immensely. It was wild and free.

Slide 16

[image of] Harry Waitzman, 1927-2016
I wanted to be a fish man just like my father and he told me you’re not going to become a fish man, you’re going to become a doctorlawyer!

Slide 17

[image of photocollage]
Listen to our stories
soundcloud.com/rocklandroom

Slide 18

What’s next?

  • More diversity of  interviewees
  • More training for  volunteers and staff
  • Partnerships with  schools in use of  interviews

[image of boy listening to oral histories at the Clarkstown 225th anniversary exhibit opening at the Town Hall]

Slide 19

Cool Stuff We Like (and we thought you’d like them too!)
[images of Bethlehem Public Library sign, logo and director Geoffrey Kirkpatrick]
Geoffrey Kirkpatrick
Library Director
Bethlehem Public Library
geoff@bethpl.org

Slide 20

Bethlehem Public Library

  • School district public library immediately south of Albany
  • Service population of 28,500

Slide 21

Wifi at the Bethlehem Town Pool

  • Worked with the town Parks and Recreation Department to provide wifi to residents at the largest town park
    • All school district residents are eligible to utilize the town pool, though there is a cost to enter pool area itself 
    • Ensure that wifi signal would be available to those not paying to enter the pool area
    • Park entrance not restricted

Slide 22

Wifi at Bethlehem Town Pool (cont.)

  • Intergovernmental Cooperation
    • Equipment, installation, and internet service provided by BPL
      • They let us drill a lot of holes in their building!
    • Space and electricity provided by town Parks and Rec

Slide 23

Marketing Our Services at the Pool
[image of woman, sign and laptop computer]

Slide 24

Elm Avenue Park Wifi Coverage
[Google Earth image of park]

Slide 25

Dero Fixit Station

  • Proximity to the Albany County Rail Trail saw an increase in the number of bicycles at the Library
  • Simple repairs available 24/7
  • Partner with local bike shop to teach people how to use the tools available

Slide 26

[image of bicycle repair station]

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Cell Phone & Tablet Charging Station

  • Originally installed in the hallway; then moved into the Library proper
  • Alleviates nervousness about leaving electronics while using the Library

Slide 28

[image of Cell Phone & Tablet Charging Station]

Slide 29

[image: closeup of section of Cell Phone & Tablet Charging Station]

Slide 30

Cellular Wifi Hotspots

  • We thought these were neat

[image shows screenshot of WiFi information on handheld device]

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[image of water fountain with provision for filling water bottles]

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[image of logo of Nothern Onondaga Public Library]
NOPL GOES MOBILE
Kate McCaffrey, Library Director
Northern Onondaga Public Library
kmccaffrey@nopl.org

Slide 33

Challenges:

  • Increasing interest in getting out of our buildings – lots of invitations
  • Feeling that we had “hit the walls” in terms of growth
  • Staff struggled with transporting and setting up tables, dealing with canopies, hauling materials
  • Presentation felt stodgy – difficult to stand out in the crowd!

Slide 34

[image of Grandview Heights Public Library’s “PopUp Library” small vehicle]

Slide 35

Costs of PopUp Library vehicle
Initial Cost: $54,160

  • Truck: $21,730
  • Custom Body: $24,181
  • Wrap: $ 1,834
  • Furnishings/accessories: $4,476
  • Technology: $1,100

Ongoing costs...gas, maintenance, insurance, staffing, materials

Slide 36

[image of interior of Stonewell Bodies, Genoa NY, where PopUp Library vehicle was built]

Slide 37

[image of NOPL Pop Up Library truck]

Slide 38

Where can we go?

  • Parks
  • Senior residences
  • Williams Beach and Oneida Shores
  • Town of Cicero Family Movie Nights
  • Camp Out Night
  • Health & Wellness Festival
  • North Syracuse Community Festival
  • Cicero Chamber Festival
  • Town of Clay Easter Egg Festival

Slide 39

[image of NOPL Pop Up Library truck; woman reading to children]

Slide 40

[image of NOPL Pop Up Library truck and people browsing books]

Slide 41

[images of NOPL Pop Up Library truck; woman reading to children]

Slide 42

[image of brick wall]
When Did We Build this Wall? Removing barriers to library access
Jennifer Palmer Schlossberg, Librarian, Head of Access and Circulation Services
Tompkins County Public Library | Ithaca, NY | www.tcpl.org
jschlossberg@tcpl.org | 607.275.1554

Slide 43

[image of brick wall]
Razing the Walls

  • Took the reins at the end of 2013
  • Restrictive policies made it difficult for staff to give good customer service
  • Couldn’t move ahead with new services if we were failing at supplying the most basic service – issuing library cards 

Slide 44

[image of brick wall and two children looking over wall]
Children in Foster Care

  • Denied cards because they did not have a financially responsible adult to sign the registration card
  • Acknowledge that these children deserve access to their public library
  • Worked with the Department of Social Services

Policy:  
http://tcpl.org/libinfo/rules-policies-foster-child-card.php

Slide 45

[image of lower brick wall and two children looking over wall]
Children with Two
Residences

  • Recognize various family structures
  • Library should not be another obstacle for a child
  • Ease tensions between households

Policy: http://tcpl.org/libinfo/rules-policies-minors-with-two-residences.php

Slide 46

[images of family with newborn; poster for “Babies Belong at the Library” programs]
Babies Belong at the Library

  • Collaboration among all 6 public libraries in Tompkins County and the Family Reading Partnership
  • Wanted families with noisy babies and nursing needs to feel welcome
  • Infants born at Cayuga Medical Center in Ithaca, NY receive their “Baby’s First Library Card along with a bag of reading-related resources prior to being discharged
  • Babies born at home, or families adopting babies, can pick up their card and bag at any of the six libraries in Tompkins County.
  • Fine-free board books

Slide 47

[images of library cards; boy and girl standing with piles of books]
Other community members now eligible for library services:

  • People (18 and over) living in a residential program
  • Adults (18 and over) and their children living in a homeless shelter
  • Young adults (13-17) living in a group home
  • Young adults (13-17) who need a card to access WiFi for their ChromeBooks

Slide 48

Thank you!
Jennifer Schlossberg, Librarian, Head of Access and Circulation Services
Tompkins County Public Library
Ithaca NY
jschlossberg@tcpl.org
http://www.tcpl.org

Slide 49

[images for “Helping All Trustees Succeed – New York and ILEAD USA]

Slide 50

56
6,000+
$1.2 billion
19.7 million
23

Slide 51

[image: photo of the PULISDO  (Public Library System Director Organization of New York State) ILEAD Team]
The PULISDO ILEAD Team

Slide 52

The Goal
To develop a standardized framework for trustee education curriculum to be deployed through the public library systems of New York State. 

Slide 53

[screen capture of the online version of Handbook For Library Trustees of New York State: http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/libdev/trustees/handbook/]

Slide 54

[image: screen capture of first page of “Trustee”: Library Trustees Association of New York State Spring 2016 newsletter]
The Results
5 custom modules launched (April 2016) : 

  • The Basics of What Every Trustee Should Know
  • Legal Issues for Libraries
  • Financial & Fiduciary Responsibilities
  • Planning & Advocacy for Library Sustainability
  • Seven Habits of Highly Effective Boards

Slide 55

Recently
Trustee Educator Cohort Meet-Up

Slide 56

The Future

Slide 57

Yay Team!
Team HATS enjoyed working together so much many of the team members are now working together on other statewide projects:

  • Mini-Webinars for Trustees for the New York State Library
  • Committee to Review NYS Minimum Standards
  • Sustainability Initiative of the New York Library Association

Slide 58

Thank you!
Sincerely, Team HATS
Rebekkah Smith Aldrich
Coordinator for Library Sustainability
Mid-Hudson Library System
rsmith@midhudson.org

Slide 59

[image: cover of book “Create Your School Library Writing Center; Grades 7-12, by Dr. Horan]
School Library Writing Center
Dr. Timothy Horan
Library Media Specialist
Hauppauge High School
horant@hauppauge.k12.ny.us

Slide 60

I Wrote the Book on School Library Writing Centers…Literally!

  • It’s was published recently by Libraries Unlimited (an imprint of ABC-CLIO)
  • It contains everything you want to know about School Library Writing Centers …but were afraid to ask!
  • And best of all, it’s well written.  You’ll love it.  I promise.

Slide 61

Look for the ‘K-6’ sequel next year…

Slide 62

The Five Mainstays of the School Library Writing Center:

  • It is located in the school library.
  • It is open during the day, and after school.
  • The majority of instruction is performed by students (peer tutors).
  • It is modeled closely on the university writing center paradigm.
  • The school librarian is the sole director, and is also a tutor (Horan 10).

Slide 63

What is a Writing Center?

  • It’s a place where students can go to receive assistance with writing assignments
  • Multiple sessions per assignment work best
  • The goal of a writing center is NOT to “fix” papers…
  • The goal is to create writers

Slide 64

What do Writing Centers do?

  • They perform peer tutoring
  • They use the form of the “one-on-one writer’s conference”
  • They assist students in all phases of writing, from initial brainstorming, to successive drafts, to final editing

Slide 65

What do Writing Centers NOT do?

  • They don’t write papers for students
  • They don’t “fix” papers
  • They don’t allow “drop offs”
  • They don’t “proofread”
  • They don’t guarantee high grades

Slide 66

Join my School Library Writing Centers Forum!

  • It’s Free!  It’s Fun!  It’s Educational!
  • I’m the Owner and Moderator
  • I will Respond to You Directly
  • You can also Chat with Each Other
  • It’s a Continuation of my Books
  • Here’s the URL: http://slwc.freeforums.net/

Slide 67

[images of students in a library]
Rochester International Academy Library’s Makerspace Storytelling Autonomous Circ
Julianne Wise
Library Media Specialist
Rochester International Academy
Rochester City School District
julianne.wise@rcsdk12.org

Slide 68

RIA Library: Patron Overview

  • We serve 350 students in grades Kindergarten through 12th grade.
  • All of our students are new arrivals to the country and speak low incident languages.
  • Approximately 95% of our students have refugee status.
  • Many arrive with interrupted or no formal education.

Meet Our RIA Library Patrons! https://youtu.be/WjxSp6hS0Lw

Slide 69

Makerspace – to – Go: Narrowing the Digital Divide

  • Many students with limited formal education are working hard to adapt to our reliance on the written word but are very comfortable learning in a three-dimensional setting.
  • A “makerspace” is a physical space that contains shared resources and is devoted to hands-on invention and creation.
  • Makerspace-to-Go is shared by all Rochester City School District libraries and was funded by Rochester Public Library’s Harold Hacker Fund.
  • It includes a Makerbot Mini Replicator 3d printer, Lego Mindstorms EV3 robotics kit, Rubix cubes, tangrams, magnetic poetry and origami paper.

Slide 70

Makerspace – to – Go: Outcomes

  • Students’ language acquisition is fostered as they enthusiastically write and speak English while collaborating on makerspace projects.
  • Experience with the shared makerspace inspired RIA teachers to obtain funding for RIA’s own permanent makerspace.
  • Teachers are now collaborating in a collegial circle as they creatively integrate these new resources into instruction.

Slide 71

Storytelling Festival: Targeted Collection Development

  • The Rochester City School Library System sponsors an annual Storytelling Festival for students attending private and public schools in Rochester.
  • Students selected culturally relevant stories from our highly diverse library collection that includes many bilingual folktales and fairy tales.
  • We had a very successful year with five well-prepared participants who earned four winning trophies for RIA.

Slide 72

Autonomous Circulation: Building Confident Patrons

  • Most of our students have not experienced a library prior to coming to RIA. Many of them have lived with limited access to information.
  • New arrivals are immediately taught our highly structured library procedures in their first language so they can begin to independently navigate the library resources.
  • Pictures remind students of procedures so those at the pre-literacy level can participate in our library culture.
  • This is one way we begin to acclimate our students to the freedoms we enjoy here in the United States.

Slide 73

Closing Comments

[image of Bernard Margolis; closing comments {not included on slide}]
Bernard Margolis, State Librarian of New York, AKA “the Wise One”

Last Updated: December 15, 2016 -- asm